HERE IT IS!

THE 2011 NewCAJE Program Book! Download to view the PDF.

NewCAJE2 -- Full Book.pdf (1,8 MB)

CLICK HERE TO SEE PICTURES OF THE 2011 CONFERENCE!

ONLINE SESSION SCHEDULE -- NOTE: THESE TABS ARE UNEDITED AND UNFORMATTED, DOWNLOAD THE PDF ABOVE FOR PROPER VIEWING

Sunday, July 31st

Sunday, July 31st, 2011

10:00–11:30 AM --------------------Early Registration (at the Marriott)

12:00-6:30 PM-----------------Regular Registration (AHA Dining Hall)

12:00-2:00 PM-----------------------------------------------------------Lunch

12:00-5:15 PM------------------------------------------------------------Expo

2:00-5:15 PM---------------------------------------------Session 1 A, B & C

5:30-6:15 PM-------------------------------------------Opening Ceremonies

6:15 PM-------------------------------------------Late Dorm Move-In Time

6:15-8:00 PM------------------------------------------------------------Dinner

8:00 PM--------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv (Dining Hall)

8:15-10:30 PM--------------------------------------------------Main Concert

11:00 PM-12:00 AM-----------------------------------------------Late Night

12:00 AM….--------------------------------------------After Hours Kumsitz

Session 1 A     2:00-5:00 PM

 

Midrashic Art  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Karen Dresser

This session will give you a selection of midrashim based on Torah texts that will expand students’  understanding and imaginations, and from which visual art and poetry can be created.  This is a higher level thinking session that is ideal for middle and high school classrooms but can be modified for younger students.  Participants in the session will be introduced to strategies for using midrashim, and will create their own art midrash based on a selected text.    

Session 1 B     2:00-3:30 PM

 

Is Lying Ever Permitted in Judaism?  

TCB 102    Nachum Amsel

We all know how important telling the truth is in a moral society and in Judaism (one of God’s names is “truth”). But is telling the truth an absolute?  Surprisingly, traditional Judaism articulates in which circumstances it is permitted to lie. This session will examine the sources and show when it is absolutely forbidden to lie and when it is permitted. No prior Jewish knowledge or Hebrew is necessary.  

Check the NewCAJE Newspage every morning for changes, additions and deletions from the daily schedule!

 

SUNDAY

Roadmap for Hebrew School Success-- Teaching for Enduring Understanding

TCB 101    Marcy Berger

In this workshop, participants will learn cutting edge pedagogical techniques that will help them shape their curriculum so that their students will remember what they learned in Hebrew School long after they have graduated. Participants will learn simple, but effective, techniques to develop units of study based on Understanding by Design or Backwards Design Principles. Together, we will clarify the larger goals we set for our students, write essential questions to guide daily planning and discuss the importance of having clear learning targets for daily lessons. Finally participants will touch on the ways to know that students are meeting the learning targets that are set for them.  

 

Service-Learning in Jewish Education and Jewish Ways of Knowing  

TCB 104    Gail Bretan

Why is (Jewish) service-learning only geared towards teens? What about retirees who want to continue to be of service and continue to learn? What about unemployed adults who now have time to learn more about themselves, about Judaism, and about the community, while looking for ways to increase their skills and knowledge in many areas? What about families?  Can learning take place in situations other than traditional education settings while simultaneously serving the community and its needs? Come to this session to learn what the literature, Jewish thought, and secular research say about this topic. You will also have an opportunity to add your suggestions to this model and have your name included in my dissertation.  

 

The Torah of Food  

TCB 105    Philip Cohen

How we get what we eat, and what we eat, have lately become important subjects for discussion. The production of food has undergone a revolution. Factory farming of animals, for example, brings inexpensive meat to the dinner table, but at what cost? The way the world has come to grow its food raises important environmental and health questions. At the same time what we eat has made too many of us fat. In this session we will raise some of these questions and study the Jewish responses to them.  

Teaching Jewish Values Through Song  

TCB 211      Eric Komar

Most educators would agree that an effective and fun way to learn a concept is by singing about it. Instruments and recording devices are welcome at this presentation of repertoire which is useful for teaching such Jewish values as “Mitzvot”  (doing commandments), “K’lal Yisrael” (Jewish community), “Tikkun olam” (repairing the world), “Pikuach nefesh”  (saving a life), “Tzedek tzedek tirdof” (Justice, justice shall you pursue) and “V’ahavta l’rei’acha kamocha” (Love your neighbor as yourself) . Attendees are encouraged to share their own ideas; the list of songs and values is not exhaustive!  

 

SUNDAY

Making Sure V'shinantam Happens: The Benefits of Family Education  

TCB 106    Miles L. Roger

In the V’ahavta prayer, we learn about the importance of teaching our children "diligently." One of the best ways to teach children is to teach by example. But what can parents do if they do not have the knowledge to teach their own children? Family Education is one of the best ways to ensure that parents will teach by example. In this session, participants will learn about creating family education programs for families with children ages 2 – 6. We will discuss programs ideas for family education that teach the parents at the same time as the children. Additionally, we will examine outreach programs that can help facilitate family education.  

 

Successful Circle Time: Activities, Games, Stories, Songs and Techniques (and Secret Weapons) for Early Ed Teachers  

TCB 113    Lauren Jane Dragutsky

Participants will walk away with activities, games, stories, songs, techniques and secret weapons for a successful circle time. I will share what works for me, as well as create a time for us to sit in a circle and share what works in our classrooms!  

Conversation Café: On the Role of “Fun” in Jewish Education 

TCB 108    Open Discussion

Currently schools in America value fun as the optimum way to get children to engage in learning. Does this idea contrast with Jewish values about learning? Why is it so important to parents and educators in Jewish schools for children to have fun? What is at risk if the students do not have fun at Jewish schools? What is at risk if they have fun but do not master Jewish skills and learning? What new insights are emerging for you here as a result of this discussion?  

Session 1 C     3:45-5:15 PM

NewCAJE Chorale  

TCB 212    Linda Hirschhorn

Join the NewCAJE chorale with Cantor Linda Hirschhorn. The choir is the ideal community that allows the individual to discover their own most beautiful voice and hold their own while listening to and helping others, recognizing that the whole sounds only as good as the individual parts. The music ranges from the simple to the complex, to satisfy and challenge inexperienced and experienced singers alike. The richness, depth and complexities of harmonies elucidate the richness, depth and complexity of texts and give them new meaning. Our songs will affirm our commitment to social justice as well as celebrate life cycle rituals that mark the common and uncommon events of our lives.  

 
 
 

SUNDAY

NewCAJE Orientation  

TCB 111    Staff

Your first time at NewCAJE? Come meet other first timers, learn how to pick sessions, and we’ll answer any questions you might have!  

Creating Benefits for Yourself and Your Staff  

TCB 101    Ahouva Steinhaus

What kinds of benefits will be of most use to you OR to your employees? Are there low cost or no cost benefits that can be offered that will really benefit employees but that won’t be expensive for employers financially or administratively? We will consider 403b plans, HSAs (health savings accounts). Professional development and synagogue and NewCAJE membership might also be affordable and valuable benefits.  

A Framework and Methodolgy for Teaching Holocaust Resistance  

TCB 102    Fred Guttman

All too often, the subject of Holocaust Resistance is not adequately taught in courses dealing with the history of the Holocaust. In this session, Fred will discuss: a) the reasons why resistance was so difficult; b) the three types of resistance, giving an example of each; c) how the topic of Righteous among the Nations fits into the teaching; d) how he uses the sites of the March of the Living trip to teach resistance; and e) why Holocaust resistance is so important developmentally for young Jewish adults.  

Madrikhim and Mentors: Teens Taking On Leadership Roles in School  

TCB 104    Lee Brice

Whether you are an Educator or a teacher with teen aides in the classroom, teens who want to come to Religious School on Sunday morning are a blessing! But too often the teachers find them a challenge, from their work ethic to their skills with students in the classroom. This session will look at a process and tools that enable a school to accept every interested teen, make a good match, and provide the training and feedback so that teachers become mentors and every teen contributes to the school.  

The Importance of Hebrew Names: Setting an Example for Our Students  

TCB 107    Immanuel Ravad

The Midrash tells us that one of the reasons God saved us from slavery in Egypt was that we remembered our Hebrew names. Why are our Hebrew names important today? How can we help our students learn to love and understand their own Hebrew names? In this session, Rabbi Ravad will share his unique understanding of this central topic in Jewish education.  

 
 
 

SUNDAY

Bal Tashchit: Every Day is Earth Day  

TCB 105    Jill D. Eisen

What is Jewish about ecology?  Jews are the original environmentalists; as God said to Adam, “I created all My beautiful and glorious works for your sake.  Take care not to corrupt and destroy My world.  For if you corrupt it, there is no one to make it right after you” (Midrash). God expects us to be partners in caring for the world.  How do we impress this Jewish value on our students and their families? We will explore why conservation and ecology are not just acts of social conscience, but sacred acts, Bal Tashchit.  Combining Torah study with concrete projects, the text will come alive for you and your students.  Projects include: “Remember to Turn off Your Lights” light switch plate, “No Idling Keychain,” and transforming the ordinary plastic bag into a wallet.  

Monsters of the Midrash  

TCB 106    David Feder

Monsters of the Midrash is an innovative learning tool featuring cooperative text study, teamwork, and game-playing strategy. Monsters of the Midrash engages teenage to adult students with some surprising content from traditional Jewish texts (Leviathan! Nephilim!), and explores the tradition of playful interpretation from the Talmud to Pokemon-style card games.   

Conversation Café: On Intermarriage   

TCB 108    Open Discussion

What is the effect of intermarriage on Jewish identity and practice in America? What do you see in your schools and congregations that can add to our understanding of this question? How do you feel about intermarriage? What do you feel called to do about it? 

Opening Ceremonies – MAKOM     5:30-6:15 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

We share our hopes and expectations for this conference, as well our dreams and prayers for Jewish education. Meet someone new, and join Nancy Katz, Jennifer Judelsohn and Cherie Koller-Fox to usher in NewCAJE2 with art, prayer and fellowship.

Main Concert     8:15-10:30 PM

 

Temple Emanuel

Across the street from the AHA Main Gate

First night. We come together from cities and towns near and far. We sing, we laugh, we dance, we dream. The many become one. Remember the old, celebrate the new. Our program begins with inspiring songs and stories by Helene and Michael Kates of The Baal Shem Tones, Peninnah Schram, and Julie Silver.

SUNDAY

Late Night     11:00 PM-12:00 AM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

Join singer/songwriters Larry Milder, Eric Komar and others, and keep the night alive!

After Hours Kumsitz     12:00 AM…

 

Fire Pit

Next to Dining Hall

For those of you who’d rather sing than sleep…bring your instruments and voices!

Monday, August 1st

Monday, August 1st, 2011

7:00–8:00 AM ---------------------Shacharit Rosh Chodesh (Dining Hall)

7:30-8:45 AM---------------------------------------------------Hot Breakfast

8:45-9:45 AM-------------------------------------------------Cold Breakfast

8:45 AM-12:00 PM----------------------------------- Sessions 2 A, B & C

10:00 AM-5:30 PM-------------------------------------------------------Expo

11:45 AM-1:15 PM------------------------------------------------------Lunch

1:30-4:45 PM---------------------------------------------Session 3 A, B & C

5:00-5:45 PM-----------------------------------------------MAKOM Session

5:45-6:00 PM-----------------------------------------------------------Siyyum

6:00-7:15 PM------------------------------------------------------------Dinner

7:30-8:40 PM----------------------------------------------- Keynote Speaker

8:40 PM--------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv (Dining Hall)

9:00-10:45 PM--------------------------------------------------Main Concert

11:15 PM-12:15 AM-----------------------------------------------Late Night

12:15 AM….--------------------------------------------After Hours Kumsitz

Session 2 A     8:45-11:45 AM

 

Listen to Our Mentors: Young Adults Tell the Stories of Experienced Jewish Educators 

TCB 200    Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff

(OPEN ONLY BY INVITATION) In this workshop, Jennifer will share her passion for Jewish storytelling as she models effective performing and coaching techniques. Three young adults will interview three experienced Jewish educators to discover the highlights of their lives as Jews and Jewish educators. Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff will coach the young adults as a group and individually as they use their own intuition and creativity to prepare stories about their new mentors. On Tuesday night, the young adults will perform their stories for NewCAJE participants.  

Surviving the Wilderness - Torah for Baby Boomers  

TCB 208    Fred Guttman and Nancy Guttman

This is a text study of certain passages in Numbers which the teachers feel are helpful in understanding Baby Boomerhood. Taught by a rabbi and psychotherapist, each of whom will be bringing their own unique perspective to the texts, the session will deal with such questions as: What is my vision for the future? Will I ever make it to the Promised Land? What are the blessings in life? Does my life count for something? The session may serve as a guideline for an interesting adult education courses within other settings.  

 
 
 

MONDAY

Session 2 B     8:45-10:15 AM

Making Things Stick, Part I:  Cooperative Learning  

TCB 102    Diane Zimmerman

Looking for tools and techniques to engage your students in learning? Cooperative learning will improve student relations, create a more kind and caring school community AND provide opportunities for each student to engage in learning.  End Result: learning that ‘sticks’ with the students beyond your classroom.  Participants will leave this ‘hands-on’  interactive workshop ready to incorporate these new techniques in their classrooms.  Geared for religious school and day school teachers. Administrators can learn new techniques to share with their staff. Want more ‘tools’? Consider attending Making Things Stick, Part II:  Active Learning.  

Technology in Education 101  

TCB 100    Efraim Feinstein

Want to learn how to make a Wiki? Produce a YouTube? Share anything you want with anyone using Tumblr? Learn the ways to use online media development as an educational tool. We will also look at reference sites like Wikimedia Commons and Wikipedia so that your students can use and add to research online. While we are in a computer lab, if you have a laptop computer with you, please bring it for the hands-on exercises!   

Healing Scarves: Building a Caring NewCAJE Community: What will it look like?

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Nancy Katz

Artist Nancy Katz is introducing painted silk ‘healing scarves’ to NewCAJE. Completed scarves will be distributed to individuals in times of need and passed on to another as the need subsides. Join in the kavod of hiddur mitzvah as we create a total of 8 scarves at the conference.   

 

Placing Objectives for Hebrew Language Teaching and How to Plan a Lesson

TCB 104    Liat Kadosh

Knowing the level of your students will help you to decide about the objectives you want to reach by the end of each unit and by the end of each semester or school year. This workshop is designed for Hebrew teachers who are interested in setting teaching objectives for their students’ progress.  

A Giant Child-Created Siddur for your Class  

TCB 113    Lorraine Posner Arcus

"Is it my turn to lead Tefillah today?" Young students develop a deeper love and understanding of prayer when they create a personalized giant siddur. Using basic art and recycled materials, teachers will learn to guide discussions related to the Tefilot (prayers) that will lead to the students’  creative input.  

 

MONDAY

 

When the Traditional Religious School Setting No Longer Works: Come Learn How to Better Serve Families and Still Offer a Quality Jewish Education  

TCB 105    Jill D. Eisen and Dr. Eyal Bor

Do you have families who cannot or will not come to a regular religious school setting due to too much traffic, too many extra-curricular activities, a different learning style or lack of carpooling? This is a nation-wide dilemma facing supplemental religious schools.  We have been studying this issue for over five years.  We have developed alternative methods to deal with this trend such as the use of chavurot (groups) and satellite schools.  The answer lies in being flexible, convenient and meeting the personal needs of families while at the same time providing a high caliber of learning with innovative, hands-on and multi-sensory teaching methods.  By attending this session, you will learn how to duplicate these approaches.  

Unpacking Difficult Texts  

TCB 106    Tamara Beliak

Together we will study a text from the Bible that is difficult to teach because it contains sexual themes. We'll carefully read a selection of that text and discuss the many reasons why it's so difficult to teach. Then we'll explore several methods for teaching this text to learners of the various age groups we teach (adult learners, teens, tweens) in our educational settings -- day schools, supplementary schools and adult ed classes. By the end of this course you'll have gained a plurality of techniques for tackling these and texts with other difficult subject matter (such as violence and theological issues) that are important not to ignore.  

Engaging Families in Homelessness Social Action  

TCB 107    Mark Wasserman and Robin Eisenberg

Learn about a project which engages kids, parents and families in addressing the issue of homelessness in your community.  Robin Eisenberg, Director of Jewish Learning and Living at Temple Beth El in Boca Raton, Florida will present activities from her school’s curriculum around the topic of homelessness from a Jewish perspective.  Mark Wasserman will talk about Houses for Change tzedakah boxes, a fun crafts project for families with homes helping families without. He originated this project, which is now a national interfaith campaign to raise awareness of homelessness and raise funds for homeless organizations.  

Determining Which Students Need Accommodations to Learn 

TCB 111    Dr. Sandy Miller-Jacobs

Some students learn easily and shine brightly in class while others in the same classroom seem to flounder and need help.  How can I determine which students need accommodations and scaffolding to succeed?  This session will cover beginning learners through upper grades.  We will look at developmental, behavioral, and academic issues that need to be addressed for student learning.    

 

MONDAY

Shalom Bayit for Teens: Parent-Teen Relations   

TCB 211    William Berkson

Teens’ relationship with their parents is their school for how to manage all intimate relationships. And it is often a difficult challenge, as students are both dependent on parents and have a need to establish a separate identity. “Shalom Bayit” is a unique course developed by the Jewish Institute for Youth and Family. Come learn about this course which empowers teens to deal with their parents more effectively by a combination of Jewish values and social skills in communication and problem solving. This session will introduce activities used to empower students: a distinctively Jewish approach to relationships; how to judge what is fair in unequal relationships; winning cooperation and “taming the dragon”; and the “Shalom Bayit Discussion.”  

How to Write and Use a Budget  

TCB 209    Ahouva Steinhaus

Do you need to develop a budget for your project or your new job requirements? What are the elements you need to include in a budget and what will help you get the information you need to accurately plan what your project or organization will need? This is a critical element of grant writing as well as project/institution planning. How do you present a budget to a board? Should you overestimate or underestimate expenses in a budget that has to be approved by others? How do you modify a budget during the year to match existing expense realities?  

Guitar Master Class  

TCB 212    Rabbi Larry Milder

Sharpen your guitar skills while learning to play six contemporary Jewish songs. This session focuses on playing with a flat pick and learning technique that is applicable to a wide range of songs. This year’s set list includes songs by Josh Nelson, Craig Taubman, and Larry Milder, and mastering the complicated rhythm of V'shamru. Bring your guitar and a recording device. Skill level: can play bare chords.  

Empowering Your Students to Generate Midrashim  

TCB 207    Hal Miller-Jacobs

The reporter for the Canaan Times is interviewing Yitzchak just after his brother Yishmael has been banished. “So tell me Yitzchak, are you glad to see him go or are you wondering if you are next?” Faced with these types of questions, students take on roles and answer questions creatively. In this way they are essentially developing their own commentary on the text in the same way that the rabbis created Midrashim. After participating in this experiential exercise, learn how to conduct these Bibliodrama-type sessions with your own class. You will also learn the five primary reasons why this technique is so powerful and also have the opportunity to practice the technique in the session.  

 
 
 

MONDAY

Conversation Café:  On the effect of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict  

TCB 108    Open Discussion

How have events related to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict affected you personally?

As you think about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, what’s at the heart of the matter for you? Within your thinking about the conflict, do you have some areas of uncertainty that you’re willing to speak about? For example, can you think of a time when the values you hold about Israel bumped up against other values that are also important to you? Do your students seem aware of what is happening in Israel? How do you think we should teach about modern Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? What did you hear in this discussion that surprised you? What challenged you?

Session 2 C     10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Making Things Stick Part 2:  Active Learning  

TCB 102    Diane Zimmerman

Are you ready to explore activities that will get your students out of their chairs and into learning?  Do you want a class that has each student actively (instead of passively) learning any subject matter?  Participants in this workshop will actively engage in strategies that will enliven the learning in their classrooms and deepen students’ understanding of the material. End Result:  learning that ‘sticks’ with the students beyond your classroom.  Participants will leave this ‘hands-on’  interactive workshop ready to engage their students with active learning techniques.  Geared for religious school and day school teachers and the administrators who teach them.  Note that there is also a Part One to this workshop that would be helpful but is not necessary to attend.  

Technology in Education 201  

TCB 100    Efraim Feinstein

Looking to learn to use more sophisticated online media tools? This session will including using app-development toolkits to produce useful educational applications with minimal programming. I will also show you how to collaborate with developers to enable students to join existing open source projects such as the Open Siddur and other Jewish open source projects. While we are in a computer lab, if you have a laptop computer with you, please bring it for the hands-on exercises!  

Healing Scarves: Building a Caring NewCAJE Community  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Nancy Katz

Artist Nancy Katz is introducing painted silk ‘healing scarves’ to NewCAJE. Completed scarves will be distributed to individuals in times of need and passed on to another as the need subsides. Join in the kavod of hiddur mitzvah as we create a total of 8 scarves at the conference.   

 
 

MONDAY

The Future of History: Online Resources to Re-live the Modern Jewish Experience

TCB 104    Adam Soclof

This workshop will demonstrate several online resources that teachers can integrate into their lesson plans in order to engage online-savvy youth. Our starting point will be the JTA Jewish News Archive, a free online database of more than 200,000 articles of Jewish interest dating back to 1923. Learn how to build a "This Day in Jewish History" calendar, how to research information about local communities, and examine innovative techniques for re-living history through historic news reports. Other topics to be addressed include social media skills, tracking current events, and cooperative Wikipedia editing. At the end of this session, participants will share their ideas for future development of the Jewish News Archive.  

Totally Tot Shabbat With Ellen Allard  

TCB 113    Ellen Allard

Take your Tot Shabbat to a whole new level! Join multi-award winning recording artist, composer, performer and educator Ellen Allard as she shares her finely honed Tot Shabbat tips and techniques that will help you build and maintain a loyal and enthusiastic following of young children and parents who will sing and dance and pray as one big, loving community. Wear comfortable shoes and bring rhythm instruments!   

But I Can’t See My Soul! How to Teach the World of the Spirit to our Youth  

TCB 105    Sam Glaser

Take a journey into the Kabbalistic teachings concerning the human soul. How can we know that we have one? What's the difference between nefesh, ruach and n'shama? How do Jewish and gentile souls compare? A remarkable, common sense methodology to understanding our role in the spiritual realm and our relationship with our Creator in day-to-day life. Participants will emerge with a proven method of communicating these challenging concepts to tweens and teens.  

Shabbat Alive! A New Approach to Junior Congregation  

TCB 107    Lisa Aamodt

An innovative approach to designing, advertising and running a successful Youth Congregation! Hear about a model being used at the Merrick Jewish Centre which gives students a Shabbat or Yom Tov Service experience through prayer, games, storytelling, reenactments, puzzles, scavenger hunts and mysteries. Learn some Shabbat/Holiday activities which pair with Parashiyyot, Holidays, Jewish Teachings and ways to encourage a youth led service which challenge the students to grow and take ownership of the service. During this course participants will have an opportunity see sample advertisements, try out new engaging Shabbat projects and share personal teaching reflections and ideas which will enhance the class’s learning experience.  

 
 

MONDAY

The Traditional Jewish View of Ecology and the Environment  

TCB 106    Nachum Amsel

Long before the word ”green” depicted an attitude about the world, and long before the word “ecology” was even invented, Judaism outlined a clear view of ecology and even how to deal with the moral problems involved.  This session will examine that attitude through the traditional sources, and discover how our ancient tradition was thousands of years before its time. No prior Jewish knowledge or Hebrew is necessary.  

Stories We Pray  

TCB 101    Joel Lurie Grishaver

Every prayer has a story. Most of them come from the Midrash. When we know the story of where in Jewish history the prayer emerges, we learn the secret of its inner meaning. This workshop will change your relationship with the Siddur.  

 

Using Appreciative Inquiry to Drive Powerful, Positive Change in Students and Schools 

TCB Seminar 2nd Floor  Deborah Grayson Riegel

Traditional approaches to solving learning, behavioral, and organizational problems focus on diagnosing what’s wrong and what’s broken. This session will teach the four keys steps of Appreciative Inquiry (A.I.), a tool developed by the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University. A.I. applies Discovery, Dream, Design and Destiny to drive powerful, positive change by focusing on what is working, and tapping into the current resources, assets and strengths of the individual and the institution. Bring your problem and leave with possibilities!  

 

Prayer Beyond Words (The NigGun)  

TCB 212    Helene Kates

A Chassidic saying goes: "Words are the pen of the heart but melody is the pen of the Soul." Experience a deeper level of prayer beyond words. Niggunim can take us to a place beyond where words are able to reach. Come learn, sing and explore the meaning in these melodies. See the images, feel the connection and share the stories they tell us. At the end, we will tell our own story by creating a new niggun of our own.  

Prayerbook Hebrew Can Be Fun for Grades 4-6  

TCB 211    Eric Komar

Are your Hebrew students past learning the alef-bet but still have time before Bar/Bat Mitzvah prep to deepen their Hebrew/prayer skills? In the age of iPhones, texting and reality TV, how do we successfully engage preteens in prayerbook Hebrew? Learn some ideas that have proven very effective in my 5th grade classes and which can easily be adapted for other intermediate grades. Special attention will be devoted to a series of “Survivor”-type activities, in which students compete in both individual and team reading activities. The students have so much fun throughout the year, they barely realize the curriculum is intense, the materials serious, and the expectations high.  

MONDAY

My Father Was a Wandering What?  

TCB 111    Everett Fox

The Passover Haggadah contains a text from Deuteronomy 26 which forms the basis of the little-understood Midrash section of the Seder. It describes how farmers are supposed to bring an offering of their crops to the priest and make a special declaration. This short speech teaches about gratitude for the land, but it also forms the backbone of the Haggadah. Together we will do a close reading of this text, to understand both the biblical message and the Midrash that emanates from it, and how best to bring this understanding into the Seder. 

Session 3 A     1:30-4:30 PM

Ten Art Activities for the Cycle of the Year  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Karen Dresser

Looking for new art activities for your classrooms or for family events?  This session can offer you at least ten accessible activities that are loosely tied to the chagim and related texts, and that go beyond the usual fare to stretch spiritual imagination and growth.  The session includes hands-on art-making for several of the projects.    

Jewish Spiritual Direction for Teachers: A Step on Your Journey  

TCB 211    Marge Eiseman and Jennifer Judelsohn

"Birth is a beginning; death a destination and life is a journey, lived on the way..." But how many of us were taught how to make this journey a life of meaning and purpose? And, can we teach this to our students? Is there a way to live and learn that can make the practice of teaching Judaism feel sacred and holy to us? Music, prayer, art, poetry, movement and meditation have been tools for enriching the spiritual life of Jews (and in this setting, Jewish teachers), and we will sample these during a session that just might change your life!  

Session 3 B     1:30-3:00 PM

Turn the Danger Down: Make Diversity Work for You  

TCB 102    Dr. Hana Bor

Diversity is real. It affects all of us. Take home hands-on exercises to engage your students, colleagues and communities in building respect for each other –  whether your differences come from religious, national or personal backgrounds. These tools can help you use diversity as an opportunity to engage each student and to build stronger connections with your colleagues and families. 

 
 
 

MONDAY

Avadim Hayinu: Dance Your Way to Freedom Through the Holidays  

TCB 212    Aliya Cheskis-Cotel

Dance your way through the holiday cycle with new dances for Yamim Noraim, Chanuka, Tu B'Shevat, Purim, Pesach, Yom Ha'atzmaut, Shavuot, Shabbat, and Hallel. Come, kick up your heels and add rhythmic, simple, and fun folk dances to your holiday teaching. Guaranteed to get children and adults on their feet with enthusiasm.  

The Book of Psalms  

TCB 104    Yosef Leibowitz

The Psalms are most often known to us through the prayer book. They are said and sung but often not analyzed. We will analyze two or three Psalms which lie at the base of our prayers to uncover the reasons that the rabbis used them.  

How to Start Teaching Hebrew from Alef and to Choose the Right Topics to Teach 

TCB 105    Liat Kadosh

This workshop is designed for teachers of Hebrew language who are teaching in Hebrew schools for one to two hours a week. How do you start teaching the Alef-Bet? Will a student be interested in learning to read and write Hebrew? How can teachers of this Hebrew language level support Judaic studies? How do you motivate a student and make sure they remember? How do you determine the best topics to teach that will engage the students and bring out productive skills right from the beginning?  This is a practical workshop that will offer discussions about methods and step-by-step materials to keep.    

The State of Yiddish Today: Locally, Globally, in Outer Space  

TCB 106    Marcia Gruss Levinsohn and Amanda Jill Wood

Did you know there are a lot of Yiddish language resources available in your local community and even on the web? Would you like to be able to teach your students about Yiddish language and culture? In this session, we will sing and speak a little bit of Mamaloschen. If you can read Hebrew, you can read Yiddish! So come and see what Yiddish can add to your classroom or school.  

 

They Come For Their Friends…  Creating a High School Midrasha Where Teens Want to Come

TCB 209    Lee Brice

Parents stopped me this year to tell me their child wants to come to Midrasha! Given a conflict, their child is choosing Midrasha, even over sports. What are the elements in this high school program that have changed the teen culture from “My parents make me” to “C’mon, it’s time for Midrasha!”? This session will explore how one program provides social time, integration with youth group and religious school, Jewish identity and Jewish learning in a way that has even reluctant students showing up with enthusiasm.  

 

MONDAY

 

iProjects: A 21st Century Approach to Individualized Learning in Grades 4-8 

TCB 107    Cherie Koller-Fox

What we often remember of elementary school is a project we did on a subject that interested us. In Jewish education, this personal connection is especially important because it strengthens Jewish identity and develops interests that a child might want to explore further in college or as an adult. This session will teach you how to help each child find what interests them about Judaism and how to use the resources of the Internet to create meaningful study in a wide range of Jewish topics. This method can be used with a library as well, but the Internet opens up endless possibilities. Learn how to keep records of each child's progress and ways of sharing what they've learned with peers and parents alike.   

 

Incorporating Jewish Music into the Jewish ECE Classroom (Even if You Are a Teacher Who "Can't Sing")  

TCB 113    Emily Aronoff

This workshop is designed for Jewish Early Childhood Educators who are willing and motivated to integrate music into their classroom life. The workshop will provide information on the topic of Jewish music, music education and early childhood education theory. The purpose of the workshop is to acquire strategies that incorporate Jewish music in a developmentally appropriate way in the classroom and how to seamlessly integrate such music into an existing curriculum. Educators will leave equipped with new skills, resources and confidence to bring back into their classroom. Appropriate for teachers working with toddler-grade 2 students.  

Jewish Humor  

TCB 111    Leo Michel Abrami

A Jewish joke is more than just a funny story; it often conveys an important message to the listener. Humor helps us cope with the adversity and unpleasantness in our lives. As a people, over the centuries we have had to cope with our share of adversity. How does our humor reflect our culture of values and survival? In this session you'll certainly hear a lot of jokes, but you'll also gain a deeper understanding of why they're funny.  

The Historical Integrity of Our Communal Narrative  

TCB 208    Jonina Duker

What do the recent DNA studies tell us about the history and migrations of the Jewish people? Which communities show evidence of biological descent from B’nai Yisrael, the ancient Israelites, and which ones probably joined the Jewish people after Biblical times? The answers may surprise you and differ on occasion from the decisions of the Rabbinate in Israel. The studies of Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA will be discussed in lay rather than scientific terms. Recent DNA studies confirm the historical integrity of our communal narrative. Regardless of an individual’s path to a Jewish identity, the new scientific evidence supporting our communal narrative is powerful, compelling, and relevant.  

MONDAY

 

21st Century Education for 21st Century Students  

TCB 206    Jonathon Feinberg

Jewish education provides great access to Jewish heritage and culture, but how do we keep Judaism relevant to students with ever-widening interests? Youths spend an increasing amount of time with online games, social networking, and other new interactive media, a trend to which many schools are slow to catch on. Increasing concern over global issues combines with decreasing community cohesiveness, necessitating an educational shift to keep Judaism relevant. We will discuss the inclusion of gaming and social networking technologies into classrooms and curricula, as well as contemporary societal issues. The session will highlight successful examples in the field, including Sviva Israel's online Jewish-environmental education platform, the EcoCampus.  

Much More Than “Thanks for the Grub” –  A Look at Birkat haMazon  

TCB 204    Richard Fagan

We say it, pray it, and sing the Blessing after Meals with gusto. But what does it really mean? Why are so many issues other than thanks for food involved? We will examine the words and paragraphs carefully, as “text detectives”  bringing out the meanings and connections, seasoned with suggestions from traditional and modern commentators. Though this session is intended as text study for us, the strategies involved can readily be used with students.  

Conversation Café: On Educational Leadership and Obstacles to Success  

TCB 108    Open Discussion

What does it take to be a successful and effective educational leader? What have you accomplished as an educational leader that makes you most proud? What obstacles do you face when you try to achieve your goals? If money were not a factor, would you choose to go back into the classroom or continue in a leadership role? What would it take to create change on the issues you’ve raised that concern you?

Session 3 C     3:15-4:45 PM

NewCAJE Chorale  

TCB 201    Linda Hirschhorn

Join the NewCAJE chorale with Cantor Linda Hirschhorn. The choir is the ideal community that allows the individual to discover their own most beautiful voice and hold their own while listening to and helping others, recognizing that the whole sounds only as good as the individual parts. The music ranges from the simple to the complex to satisfy and challenge inexperienced and experienced singers alike. The richness, depth and complexities of harmonies elucidate the richness, depth and complexity of texts and give them new meaning. Our songs will affirm our commitment to social justice as well as celebrate life cycle rituals that mark the common and uncommon events of our lives.  

MONDAY 

 

An Improvisational/Participatory “Out-There!” Approach to Engaging Teens with Jewish Music and Concepts  

TCB 212    Jordan Hill

Music plays such a central role in Jewish life, yet how to connect teens, so often passionate about music, with this tradition? Jordan Hill—musician, storyteller, educator—has developed a number of highly engaging/effective techniques to do just this. His approaches range from avant-garde improvisational music to American Indian drum-and-chant; they are inspired by klezmer and Hassidic insights into music; and they all come together to plug teens—musicians and non-musicians alike—into a direct, hands-on experience with Jewish music and, through it, Judaism itself. The workshop will be as hands-on as the techniques, giving educators an experience with a number of approaches that they can take home and apply in their own communities. Be prepared to jam.  

Teaching Jewishly  

TCB 101    Joel Lurie Grishaver

An exploration of how Jewish values influence education. By using Jewish sources as a foundation, Joel looks at how one creates a classroom and other learning environments based on respect and dignity, that facilitates growth, esteem, and community, and that makes the process of Jewish education an expression of the Jewish message.  

Israeli Folk Dancing for Preschool Children  

TCB 113    Donna Hendel

Children ages 2 through 6 are the perfect age to begin Israeli folk dancing. Through jumping, stepping, running, leaping, acting, shaking and DANCING, preschool children acquire Hebrew language, Jewish holiday learning and the basics of movement and rhythm with the use of contemporary and traditional Israeli and contemporary Jewish music. Come ready to have a nice workout while you learn how to bring back this special way of Judaic knowledge acquisition to your Jewish early childhood classroom.  

Making Accommodations for Students with Special Learning Needs  

TCB 102    Dr. Sandy Miller-Jacobs

Many teachers wonder how they are going to successfully reach all the students in their classes, especially those who, diagnosed or not, appear to have special learning needs (e.g., ADHD, Executive Function Disorder, Learning Disabilities). This workshop will examine ways to provide accommodations to your students, to enable them to meet your learning goals successfully, and to provide challenging and respectful tasks.  

Pirke Avot: Applying Ancient Wisdom Today  

TCB 107    William Berkson

We will compare the advice that the Jewish Sages give to that of modern psychology and of popular culture. Where do they agree and support each other? Where do they conflict? We will focus on Mishnayot on anger, humility, and self-control.  

MONDAY

 

The Art of Contract Negotiation: Know What You are Worth, and Get What You Deserve

TCB 104    Eitan Gutin

After more than a decade as a full time Jewish educator, I can finally say that I am satisfied with my new contract and with the process through which I got to it. Please join me for a discussion about what tools and strategies I used to figure out what I am worth, and to (nearly) get what I deserve. Do you have advice to share for other educators? Please come and share as part of an open forum. Do you think you should have a better salary and more benefits? Come and learn.  

How to Teach Israel Effectively and Convincingly in the Digital Age 

TCB 105    Nachum Amsel

We are currently losing the propaganda war about Israel if our kids only believe what they hear about Israel in the news and not what we teach about Israel. The Destiny Foundation has developed a new methodology to show, teach, and help internalize Jewish values and a love for Israel. Using new film clips, with lesson plans, moral dilemmas, etc. the students will learn about the State in an exciting and engaging way. All materials are digital usable and appropriate for ages 10+ in a wide range of educational settings. Participants will receive free media and teaching tools that can be used immediately in the classroom (including a DVD and Educational Guide with 19 lessons plans).  

Oh (BLEEP!) Another Meeting?  

TCB Seminar, 2nd Floor  Deborah Grayson Riegel

More schmoozing than strategic thinking? More opinions than outcomes? More food than facilitation? It must be a Jewish meeting! Every time you hold a meeting you have an opportunity to re-engage participants in the vital work of the organization. How many of these opportunities are you missing? If your meetings are unproductive, unfocused or unpopular – this session is for you. Participants will learn how to consistently meet the 3 criteria for productive meetings, how to build an outcome-based agenda that drives the entire meeting, how to use the meeting to reinforce Jewish values, and 8 other miraculous meeting makeovers.  

Navigating the Politics  

TCB 106    Elizabeth Singer

The more roles one person assumes, the broader the spectrum of interested stakeholders. The beauty and difficulty of working within a non-profit setting is that there are a lot of stakeholders and not a lot of staff. How can we accommodate everyone's interests, especially when we are so strapped for time, money and energy? Come for a discussion on the culture of various programs and how we can do our best listen to our board, our lay leaders, our employees, our parents, and our students. We will discuss how to communicate, how much to tell any one person, and how to do all of this while remaining the consummate professional.  

 

MONDAY

Musical Connections among Jews, Muslims and Hindus  

TCB 111    Neil Schwartz

Why does much of the ancient music of Jews, Muslims and Hindus sound similar? We will learn about musical modes that are chanted from Northern India to Southern Spain, and some possible reasons for these similarities. As we do so, we will encounter Hindus, Turks, Persians, Arabs, Byzantine Greeks, Gypsies, and Spanish Moors.  

 

When History Has a Name, a Face and a Story: Using New Technologies to Connect Students to 20th Century Jewish History  

TCB 206    Lauren B. Granite, Ph.D.

If you like learning about innovative approaches to Jewish History, we'd love to invite you to a workshop about Centropa, a resource for Jewish educators.  From 2000-2008 Centropa interviewed (audiotape only) Holocaust survivors in Central Europe, focusing on how they lived, not how they or their relatives suffered and died, and digitizing their family photographs.  The interviews (over 1,200) and photographs (over 22,000) can be found at www.centropa.org.  This workshop will show you all of Centropa’s resources: databases, short multimedia films telling personal stories, our site where students upload work, and our international teacher’s network.  Bring your laptops for an interactive exploration of new technologies to teach 20th century Jewish history, empower students to tell their family stories and connect Jewish students around the world. 

 

CONGREGATIONAL SCHOOLS IN TRANSITION: CHALLENGE AND OPPORTUNITY

TCB 202    Josh Bender

The long-time director has left and now you are up to bat!  What is the curriculum?  Is there a curriculum?  What do the teachers think of you?  How do you build trust among the faculty, the parent body, the lay leadership?  Do you build on the success of the existing educational program or change things dramatically?  So many pieces are broken, where do you begin?  Feeling overwhelmed?  Oh, and by the way, the Rabbi just announced that he is retiring. It seems that congregational schools are always in transition.  If you have had the above experiences and are looking to dialogue on ways to deal with transition in your synagogue, join us for this workshop.  The workshop will be helpful for new directors and directors who have a couple years under their belt. We will share and support each other and also look at some organizational models and theories that can help us weather the storm of change.

 

MONDAY

Music as D’Var Torah – MAKOM     5:00-5:45 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

As we explore what text means to us we try to zero in on what feelings are generated by the words. Linda Hirschhorn will help us lift our voices in song. Her focus is on the consonance of word and melody so that even someone who is not fluent in Hebrew might still be able to feel from the music what a prayer is about. Come join the NewCAJE community as we gather together to create holy space and welcome the month of Av. 

Traditional Siyyum With Rabbi Nachum Amsel        5:45 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

The first 9 days of Av are considered by the rabbis to be days of mourning in which such joyful practices as eating meat are forbidden. Yet, some things supersede this requirement such as a festive meal after a Brit Milah. Not having an 8-day-old baby boy handy, Nahum Amsel took the time this summer to study Masechet Makkot and we will be celebrating a festive meal with him to mark this occasion. Makkot has some wonderful things to say about scholars and commandments, but mostly it is focused on punishment—namely those crimes punishable by exile and by flogging. Joining together with Nachum will make it possible for all of us to eat a meat meal this evening. Even though he is the only one who has studied, each of us are rejoicing with him because he has completed this task. Amazingly, it is our joy, not the actual torah spoken, that gives the meal the status of a Seudat Mitzvah.

ARE YOU READY FOR TONIGHT’S PROGRAMING???

** Keynote Speaker, Dr. Ken Stein and his thoughts about knowing Israel

** A concert with Cherie Karo Schwartz, Beth Schafer & Joe Black,

Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff, and Michelle Citrin

** A special tribute to Debbie Friedman

 

This is what makes NewCAJE so special….

 

MONDAY
Keynote Speaker: Dr. Ken Stein

7:30-8:40 PM

Beit Am

Dining Hall

 

Knowing Israel Like You Know “The Four Questions"

At Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, Dr. Kenneth W. Stein is the William E. Schatten Professor of Contemporary Middle Eastern History, Political Science and Israeli Studies. Since coming to Emory in 1977, he founded and developed the International Studies Center, was the first director of the Carter Center (1983-1986), and established in 1988, the Institute for the Study of Modern Israel (ISMI). In Spring 2006, he was a visiting professor of Political Science at Brown University.

 

Dr. Stein is the author of numerous books and publications. Among them are Hebrew and English editions of Heroic Diplomacy: Sadat, Kissinger, Carter, Begin and the Quest for Arab-Israeli Peace (Routledge:1999); Making Peace Among Arabs and Israelis: Lessons from Fifty Years of Negotiating Experience (United States Institute for Peace:1991), and The Land Question in Palestine, 1917-1939 (North Carolina Press: 1984, 1985, and 2003). His almost three dozen journal articles and book chapters have focused on the origins of modern Israel, American foreign policy toward the Middle East, history of the yishuv (1880s-1940s), Palestinian politics, inter-Arab relations, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Stein serves on the Editorial Board of Middle East Quarterly.

 

His honors at Emory University include recognition for internationalizing the curriculum and the highest teaching awards for his undergraduate teaching. The ADL and the Israel on Campus Coalition awarded him the 2007 Ross Award for his intellectual integrity in speaking out against the falsehoods in former President Jimmy Carter’s 2006 book Palestine: Peace not Apartheid.

 
 

MONDAY

 

Dr. Stein received his undergraduate BA degree from Franklin and Marshall College and two Masters and his doctoral degree from the University of Michigan (1976). From 1971-1973, he did graduate work and language study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In Atlanta, he has served extensive stints as personal director of the Greenfield Hebrew Academy, on the regional boards of the American Jewish Committee, the Anti-Defamation League, and the Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation.

Main Concert     9:00-10:45 PM

 

Temple Emanuel

Across the street from the AHA Main Gate

 

Music and Stories are the food and drink of the soul. Join

 

Cherie Karo Schwartz

Beth Schafer & Joe Black

Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff

Michelle Citrin

 

as they usher us into this year’s conference with joy through the sounds of their voices.

Late Night – Remembering Debbie

11:15 PM-12:15 AM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

Join Julie Silver, Peninnah Schram and others as we recall our friend Debbie Friedman. We will gather to share stories about Debbie and stories about the impact her songs had on us and our students. We will begin and end with one of her songs and of course, and we will say a Kaddish in her memory.

After Hours Kumsitz     12:15 AM…

 

Fire Pit

Next to Dining Hall

For those of you who’d rather sing than sleep…bring your instruments and voices!

Tuesday, August 2nd

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

7:00–8:00 AM ---------------------------------------Shacharit (Dining Hall)

7:30-8:45 AM---------------------------------------------------Hot Breakfast

8:45-9:45 AM-------------------------------------------------Cold Breakfast

8:45 AM-12:00 PM----------------------------------- Sessions 4 A, B & C

10:00 AM-5:45 PM-------------------------------------------------------Expo

11:45 AM-1:15 PM------------------------------------------------------Lunch

1:30-2:15 PM---------------------------------------------- MAKOM Session

2:30-5:45 PM---------------------------------------------Session 5 A, B & C

5:45 PM----------------NewCAJE Toast and Special Siyyum (TCB Hall)

6:00-7:15 PM-------------------------------------------------------------Dinner

7:15-8:15 PM-------------------AHA Presentation & Tribute to Educators

8:15 PM---------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv (Dining Hall)

8:30-11:00 PM---------------------------------------------------Main Concert

11:15 PM-12:15 AM------------------------------------------------Late Night

12:15 AM….---------------------------------------------After Hours Kumsitz

Session 4 A     8:45-11:45 AM

Teaching as a Learning Coach: Creating an Active Classroom  

TCB 211    Adam Tilove

There is an adage that "A teacher shouldn't be the sage on the stage, but rather the guide on the side."  This session will teach some basic elements of the constructivist classroom including:  how to structure group work, how to use technology in engaging and meaningful ways, how to build meaningful assessments, and how to allow for students to engage in meaningful and self-directed work in the classroom. The lion’s share of the class will be taught modeling constructivist techniques. Participants will work in small groups, brainstorming, building units and/or lessons, and sharing ideas to receive feedback.  Participants will leave the session with a significant product they can use in the classroom.  

Old Wine in New Bottles - Trope and Nusach  

TCB 202    Neil Schwartz

Calling all teachers of Trope and davenning, Jr. Congregation leaders, adult lay religious leaders, and interested learners. Come meet some new technologies for teaching ancient Jewish chanting - software, the Internet, and online teaching modalities. We will use many newly revised teaching materials to study basic Hebrew grammar, Biblical Cantillation, and the musical prayer-modes of Nusach HaTefillah.  

 
 

TUESDAY

Session 4 B     8:45-10:15 AM

Praying With Our Feet: Walking the Walk and Talking the Talk  

TCB 207    Janie Grackin, Helene Kates and Ellen Allard

Explore new avenues of Jewish spirituality through song, story, tefillah and social action. Learn how to create a multi-sensory/multi-disciplinary approach to expressing Judaism through our hands, our mouths, and our hearts.  

The Jewish Calendar  

TCB 102    Yosef Leibowitz

The Jewish holidays are all interconnected. They tell a story beginning with Shabbat and ending with the Rabbinic holidays. We will study both the particular texts and look at the total picture.  

Director Survival Workshop  

TCB 104    Amy Ripps and Robin Eisenberg

People not programs, teach the teachers, loyalty to students, core beliefs – create your own “mantra” as a school director.  Join us for a tachlis session about running a successful school including some philosophy as well as some nuts and bolts. Take away materials and ideas to add to your “toolbox.”  Learn with two veteran directors with experience in a large, resource-rich community as well as one in a small, remote and resource-poor community.  

13 Principles of Teaching  

TCB 105    Anna Salomon

Rambam gave us 13 Principles of Faith – the closest thing Judaism has to a formal statement of belief. In this session we will examine our own core beliefs and values of Jewish education of all kinds to create our own 13 Principles of Teaching that will help guide our work and center our teaching.  

Words that Harm, Words That Help—Teaching about Lashon Hara  

TCB 106    William Berkson

Seventh grade, age 12-13, is a key point where children gain the ability to understand and influence their relationships. Cruel tongues (lashon hara) are rife at this age, whether in person, on the Internet or on the phone. This stage of life represents a unique window of opportunity to show students how Judaism teaches them not just how to pray, but how to live. Rabbinic teachings can help them to strengthen their relationships, help others and defend themselves. You will learn a case-study method for bringing home to students the damage to relationships done by lashon hara, and for teaching positive speech. This method can be used for issues in the news, but it can also we used to discuss issues you see your students dealing with.   

 

TUESDAY

Torah Alive! An Experiential Approach to Teaching Torah to Young Children

TCB 113    Lorraine Posner Arcus

“Look at me! I’m Sarah! Look at me! I’m Avraham!” Add a new dimension to your Early Childhood curriculum. Discover how to make the Torah lessons come alive for early childhood students through dramatic presentation of the text and creative role-playing. Learn how to create scenery, props, and easy costumes to enhance the dramatic presentation of the Torah lessons. Enhance the learning and understanding of the Torah lessons through discussion topics, craft ideas, cooking activities, and puppets. Learn how to make Torah study an essential part of your curriculum and a bridge between home and school.  

 

Teaching the Holocaust through the Language of Today: The Coming of Age in the Holocaust Website and Curriculum 

TCB 100    Dr. Paul Radensky

As the Holocaust recedes into memory and survivors pass away, teaching the Holocaust meaningfully becomes increasingly important. "Coming of Age in the Holocaust, Coming of Age Now" is a free online curriculum that presents the Holocaust through the lives of 12 young people in Europe and Mandatory Palestine. During the war, these young people, who were close in age to our students, grew and accepted new responsibilities. Reading their stories and listening to testimony, students will learn about the Holocaust in a personal way and consider what coming of age means today. Teachers will learn how to use the website to enable students to partner with students around the world who are studying the "Coming of Age" curriculum.  

Storytelling and Drama Games for the Jewish Classroom 

TCB 212    Jordan Hill

Storytelling and drama games are a tremendously effective means for giving students a hands-on way to access and directly engage with the material being taught in a classroom in a fun and exciting way. This hands-on workshop covers a number of easy-to-learn games and activities that can be used in a wide variety of contexts. Be ready to play!  

A School-Wide Program for Teaching Hebrew Reading  

TCB 209    Diana Yacobi

The Sarah and David curriculum was built backwards from Bar/Bat Mitzvah with the goal of addressing reading difficulties that students continue to have into the upper grades. The session will feature techniques designed to improve Hebrew reading accuracy and fluency for Pre-Bar/Bat Mitzvah students in 5th –  7th grade. In this hands-on workshop participants will receive a copy of The Skill and Drill Book in order to practice techniques to improve Hebrew reading. Other materials that we'll be discussing will not be sold at the session itself, but will be available at the exhibit area throughout the conference.  

 
 

TUESDAY

Bringing the Scribal Arts to Life  

TCB 107    Zerach Greenfield

At this session I will explain the making of Sifrei Torah, Tefillin and Mezuzot. This session will present numerous teaching techniques that will help teachers bring to life the world of the Scribal Arts to their students.  

Torah and Science: The Questions Students Ask, and Some Answers  

TCB 111    Paul Solyn

What do you say when students question the veracity of Torah, or point out that they learned something different in science class? Do you reply that all of it is true, most of it is true, some of it is true? Is it all myth? And what is sacred myth? Or do the Torah and modern science tell us the same story? In this session we’ll explore several approaches to reconciling belief in Torah with belief in science, discuss the value of each approach for the settings in which we teach, and develop plans for answering students’ questions authentically and productively while strengthening, not undermining, belief.  

 

Am I Awake?: A Workshop in Finding and Teaching Personal Connection in Contemporary Jewish Prayer  

TCB 201    Noah Aronson

"Why do I need to learn this?"  "When am I ever going to use this information?!" 'Am I Awake' is a workshop on how to teach students to create personal connections with the prayers they are learning.  Using his original musical settings, Noah demonstrates how encouraging children to create personal relationships with the texts allows them to take ownership of the liturgy and grow more connected to Judaism.    

Conversation Café:  On Faith 

TCB 108    Open Discussion

There are passages in the liturgy and in the Bible that some people find challenging to believe. What are some of the ideas, texts or beliefs within Judaism that you find problematic? What thoughts and feelings are stirred in you when you encounter them? How have you reconciled these difficulties in your personal beliefs with your professional responsibilities? Have your questions of faith evolved over your lifetime? What if any new insights are emerging for you as a result of this discussion?

Session 4 C     10:30 AM-12:00 PM

Music and Leadership. A Kabbalistic Fugue  

TCB 101    Joel Lurie Grishaver

Rabbi Nachman of Bretzlav was the great grandson of the Baal Shem Tov. In his 282nd sermon in Lekutai Moharan he intertwines the double issues of the power of music and the traits of successful leadership. In this workshop we will work our way through that sermon and explore both areas.  

TUESDAY

Story Spirit: Sharpening Your Storytelling Art  

TCB 212    Cherie Karo Schwartz

Join storyteller Cherie Karo Schwartz for an interactive, engaging storytelling skill-building session. We will revisit techniques and rejuvenate the storytelling experience through a series of personal reflections, imaging, participatory activities, and improvised group interplay aimed at honing your preparation for presentations. The group will explore new and developing areas of character work, voice, and movement. In the process, uncover inner, personal connections to your stories. We will share our pearls of Jewish story wisdom with one another. Participants will create new uses and adaptations of classic Jewish sacred and folk tales to enhance their well-storied simchot (celebrations), commemorations, occasions, and themes. Storytellers of all levels of experience will learn and create with each other during this lively ninety-minute workshop.  

Jacob and Israel: Wrestling with God  

TCB 102    Everett Fox

Why are we called the People of Israel and not Jacobites? What does it mean for ancient Jews and Jews today to wrestle with God? We’ll look at Jacob’s dramatic wrestling match in Genesis 32 in the perspective of his long and turbulent life. Together will do a close reading of the text and learn how to uncover the important themes that are found there--skills translatable to other texts you may teach.  

 

The Rosenfeld Legacy Project: Connecting Children's Literature with Judaic Heritage

TCB 104    Emily Aronoff

The Rosenfeld Legacy Project: Connecting Children's Literature with Judaic Heritage was created so that this generation of Jewish children and generations to come may learn of the remarkable legacy of Judaism, its contributions to all aspects of life, and its moral and ethical principles that have shaped the world. This exciting program was created at the University of Miami under the direction of Dr. Anita Meinbach. In this workshop, Emily Aronoff, music coordinator of the project, will present and model lessons in the Rosenfeld Legacy Program. The Legacy Program includes a resource guide (a book and CD) based on eight award-winning books appropriate for students in grades K-3, which each workshop participant will receive.  

Differentiating Instruction  

TCB 105    Alan J. Levin, Ph.D.

The session will begin with a profile of the students in a typical class supporting the need for differentiating. Participants will then explore ways to differentiate and modify instruction in activities that require reading, writing, art, and cooperative work. We will take content samples from activities often used in our religious school classrooms. These will come from text books and the CHAI curriculum, but the modifications suggested will be helpful regardless of the curriculum being used. The session will focus on students in grades 1-7.  

TUESDAY

Hebrew Students’  Levels of Performance -- How to Assess Progress  

TCB 106    Liat Kadosh

Choosing Hebrew language materials to teach requires knowledge about the level of performance. This workshop will explore the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) performance guidelines and explain how well a student can function within each level of performance. This workshop is designed for teachers who want to be introduced to the variety of performance levels in Hebrew following the ACTFL guidelines.   

 

Yiddish:  The Best-kept Secret of American Jewry: Why and How to Integrate it into Your Curriculum  

TCB 107    Sheva Zucker

Many students, including those attending Jewish day schools, do not know that Yiddish is written in Hebrew characters and cannot name two Yiddish writers. This session, intended for administrators and teachers in Jewish elementary and secondary education, will discuss what Yiddish can offer students today and suggest some ways in which Yiddish can be integrated into their curriculum. We will also briefly discuss the reasons for cultural amnesia regarding Yiddish and the specific cultural literacy that comes with knowing the language. Finally, we will discuss modes of teaching something about Yiddish language and culture even when no qualified Yiddish educators are present (which is often the case).

All Together Now: Using Art to Build Community  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Nancy Katz

Creating Community is an essential part of any Jewish setting from a congregation to a classroom. How do we create community? How does having a community strengthen learning and prayer and life? In this workshop,  participants will share their successes in creating community using art and discover a variety of methods that can help to build and strengthen community in your setting.  

Restoring the "Rich" in Jewish Ritual  

TCB 208    Sam Glaser

The term "ritual" connotes a customarily repeated action, mindlessly performed out of a sense of habit or duty. We will explore the primary holidays in the Jewish calendar, investigating methods that can create a sense of excitement when each unique opportunity returns. What are the clues in our Torah and liturgy that help us perceive how our festivals can enhance our lives? How can we maximize our use of ritual objects, holiday music, food, prayer to enhance family interaction? Participants will emerge with a renewed appreciation of our chagim (holidays), empowered with practical steps to increase their community's enjoyment of the holiday.  

 
 
 

TUESDAY

I Wanna Be a Wizard! Hebrew School Goes To Camp  

TCB Seminar 2nd Floor  Deborah Salomon

Why wait for summer to attend camp? Deborah Tarasow Salomon introduces games and teaching tools to turn your Hebrew School into the best all year round camp ever. Don't you want to be a Wizard? A magical class experience to share the Wizard's own secrets in this life changing experience for all teachers, directors and educators. Active participation is encouraged and bring along your friends.   

Rules and Regs:  Oh My!  Creating Engaging and Fun Staff Orientations  

TCB 111    Diane Zimmerman

All those rules and regulations for teaching in your building… so boring, yet necessary.  This workshop will explore ways to apply active and cooperative learning techniques to the Rules and Regs part of your beginning of the year Staff Orientation.  Note:  participants might acquire other useful strategies for engaging their teachers during the all-important, but often, sort-of boring Staff Orientation.  Geared for religious school and day school principals.   

A Hat Full Of Prayers: Make Any Prayer Engaging for Your Teens  

TCB 209    Eitan Gutin

Anyone can be a Tefillah educator - anyone! All you need is a few simple tools in your pocket. In this session we will split up into teams. Each team of educators will, at random, be given a prayer, an audience, and a method. Each team will create a new way of teaching their Tefillah in a way it has not ever taught before. Throughout the session, Eitan will share insights that he has gained from spending more than 10 years teaching teens about tefillah and spirituality. 

Kirtan Meditation and A Tale – MAKOM

1:30-2:15 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall following lunch

Hebrew Kirtan is a fully participatory, call-and-response chant where short, sacred phrases from the Jewish tradition are treated as powerful, universal meditations, lead by Karen Dresser. It is at once contemplative, ecstatic and—simply fun! Janie Grackin will treat us to a soul story, and we will be refreshed and reinvigorated and ready to return to another afternoon of learning.

 
 
 
 
 

TUESDAY

Session 5 A     2:30-5:30 PM

Comfort Shawls: Embracing the Cycle of Love and Loss  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Marge Eiseman

What if we had a way to create communities in our classroom that cared about and acknowledged the personal lives of the students and teacher?  What if every classroom had its own Comfort Shawl -- there to use when a child had a bad day, or a student was moving away to a new town, or a beloved pet died? In a totally participatory workshop, you will learn the wisdom behind this simple project, share your own stories and be embraced in a "hug that lasts" of the collective caring. You’ll be encouraged to experience transparent teaching techniques around community building, empathic listening, and lowering the barriers to creative expression. In this session, we welcome all voices like tribal singing rather than having the exclusive standards of performance art.  

Session 5 B     2:30-4:00 PM

Introduction to Talmud  

TCB 102    Yosef Leibowitz

The Talmud is written in a unique form which is unfamiliar to many raised in the Western world. We will study the structure and concept and how they are presented in their unique form. The course is open to all, even those who have no background in Talmud.  

You're Never Too Young to Sing from Your Heart  

TCB 113    Susan Shane-Linder

There are no age limits to teaching children about Shabbat, Havdalah, holidays and being Jewish through catchy and interactive songs. Children of ALL ages can learn about their customs, heritage and religion from the moment they’re born. They will learn about when the Sabbath begins and when it ends. We’ll sing songs for holidays and being Jewish every day. They should begin learning about their heritage from infancy and continue to celebrate it throughout their lives.  

Engaging Parents in Their Child's Jewish Education  

TCB 211    Lori Riegel

A major challenge for many Jewish educators, especially in the supplementary school setting, is encouraging parents to not only value their child's Jewish education, but also engaging them in their child's learning. Parents can make or break a school's program by how they set their family's priorities. A family's priority level for Jewish education often falls behind sports, fine arts or other extra-curricular activities. Helping parents get themselves higher on the "get-it" scale can be frustrating and perplexing for the Jewish educator. This session will provide ideas and programs that are easy to duplicate in the supplementary school setting.   

 

TUESDAY

 

Oy Vey, They're Gay: Celebrating Diveristy and Transforming Jewish Educational Settings  

TCB 104    Joanna Ware

How can our communities clarify and actively apply positive Jewish values to teaching and learning in a manner that is consciously inclusive of LGBTQ Jews and others whose experiences are more marginal? What does it look like when we consider the experiences of the child with same gender parents or the young person struggling with gender identity as we develop and evaluate curricular materials? In this workshop, we will engage in activities that enable us to articulate the values that inform our curricular and programmatic choices. We will explore a Jewish values based approach to developing programs that you can use with your education team to create fully inclusive programs that celebrate the diversity within the Jewish community.  

Challenging Students - Creative Ways to Teach the Hebrew Language  

TCB 105    Liat Kadosh

Knowing the level of your students will help you to decide about the objectives you want to reach by the end of each unit and by the end of each semester or school year. This workshop is designed for Hebrew teachers who are interested in setting teaching objectives for their students’ progress. (It is recommended that participants take the workshop about students’  progress assessment first.)  

At the beginning…Teaching Genesis   

            TCB 106 Deborah Goldstein, Cherie Koller-Fox and Cathy Kaplan

At the beginning, Cherie asked Deborah to try out a new Bible teaching methodology she was developing based on the translations of Everett Fox. Deborah has been teaching it for four years now and Cathy began teaching Genesis last year. If you are a teacher, you will be interested in learning how we teach Bible to 4th graders and in doing so deepen our own knowledge base and comfort level. If you are a director, you will be interested in the impact Bible study has had on students and their parents, how this sea change was accomplished, and how Deborah was able to then train Cathy to teach the material. If you are a Rabbi/Cantor, you will be interested in hearing how the children learned to study text, which has deepened their Divrei Torah. If you are a parent, you’ll be interested in how much the kids enjoy what they are learning.   

Building Community in the Classroom  

TCB 107    Robin Eisenberg

Whether you have a class of five or a class of twenty-five, the concept of becoming a kehillah (community) is a basic Jewish value. In this session you explore Jewish sources about community, participate in activities which you can use in your classroom and share with your colleagues ways that they build community in their classrooms. Come and become part of our learning community!  

 

TUESDAY

Movies and Morals  

TCB 111    Nachum Amsel

Nachum Amsel’s program of teaching Jewish values using movies and TV is being taught on six continents. It is being constantly updated. Teaching students Jewish values is one of our most important goals in Jewish education, but it is not easy to do it successfully. If you want to learn how to help your students to internalize Jewish values, then attend this session. Many of today’s TV shows and movies present very real moral issues, and participants will learn how to harness this powerful medium. Participants will leave with practical examples, lesson plans and an understanding of the methodology that can be used immediately in ANY classroom or informal setting for students with any or no Jewish background, aged 10 and above.   

Split: The Difference -- Jewish Unity and Compromise   

TCB 209    Jon Wolf

Are pluralism and trust among Jews and Judaism achievable? Desirable? CAJE was a pioneer [along with Sh'ma magazine, Hillel foundations, CLAL, and others] in bringing different kinds of Jews together to learn from each other. Whither now in the 21st (58th) Century?   

What’s My Story? Expanding the Bat/Bar Mitzvah Experience 

TCB 208    Etta King

How do Jewish educators support B’nai Mitzvah students in order to build powerful connections to their heritage and a solid foundation for their future as strong Jewish adults? This session will explore the milestone of Bat/Bar Mitzvah as an opportunity for developing personal narrative and learning about family history. We will discuss how to incorporate the growing diversities that our students bring to Jewish life. Participants will consider ways to engage young people in the process of collecting oral histories and take away resources to help students discover personal meaning in this important life cycle event.   

Whispers of Shema   

TCB 212    Helene Kates

Looking for ways to help your students connect to prayer? In this interactive session we will use song, movement and meditation to develop skills that can be brought in to the classroom to help your students connect with kavannah to the Shema and other prayers. This method works across learning styles and levels and has had great success with children with ADHD and Asperger Syndrome.  

Hi, Mom! Hi, Dad!  

TCB 207    Anna Salomon

Building successful relationships with parents/guardians is an important aspect of education. It’s also time consuming and often difficult. In this session we will examine some key ways to ease the lines of communication and build meaningful relationships.  

 

TUESDAY

 

The Captives Return: Descendants of Forced Iberian Converts Find Their Way Back to Judaism  

TCB 206    Jonina Duker

Lost Jewish souls have always returned to their Jewish roots. Throughout Jewish history, communities set up funds to redeem captured Jews; money redeemed captives. In our time, learning–specifically genealogical knowledge–has become the means by which many descendants of Jews forcibly converted in Spain and Portugal centuries ago are being redeemed. Many such descendants now call themselves B’nai Anusim, Children of the Forced Ones. These descendants have a phrase, “the blood calls,” to describe how their Jewish souls find their way back to the mainstream of the Jewish people. Topics include the history of the phenomenon; relevant DNA studies; the differing experiences of Portuguese descendants in New England and Spanish descendants in the Southwest; and stories of individuals’ journeys back to Jewish identity. 

 

Creating Am Ehad

TCB 204                  Janie Grackin

How do we celebrate and honor Israel as a place for ALL Jews?  As Kulano Am Ehad, We Are One People, in a changing world where borders don’t exist and cultures clash and spin in creating new opportunities and new visions for Inter-generational Family Education.  How will this look in your school or synagogue?  Join us for an exciting and energetic collaboration of ideas and working plans.   

 

Conversation Café: On Collaboration between Day Schools and Supplementary Schools 

TCB 108    Open Discussion

Day Schools and the Supplementary Schools are currently two separate and distinct educational systems. What strengths does each model have that the other could learn from? How do you feel that Jewish education would be changed if the two systems collaborated with each other? What’s possible here, and who cares? 

Session 5 C     4:15-5:45 PM

NewCAJE Chorale  

TCB 201    Linda Hirschhorn

Join the NewCAJE chorale with Cantor Linda Hirschhorn. The choir is the ideal community that allows the individual to discover their own most beautiful voice and hold their own while listening to and helping others, recognizing that the whole sounds only as good as the individual parts. The music ranges from the simple to the complex to satisfy and challenge inexperienced and experienced singers alike. The richness, depth and complexities of harmonies elucidate the richness, depth and complexity of texts and give them new meaning. Our songs will affirm our commitment to social justice as well as celebrate life cycle rituals that mark the common and uncommon events of our lives.   

 

TUESDAY

Infuse Your Preschool Day the Jewish Way!  

TCB 113    Lisa Lasovsky

A hands-on session of ideas to incorporate Judaism in early childhood classrooms. This session is for teachers and synagogue service leaders of preschool and kindergarten-aged children in day schools, religious schools, and camp. The workshop will include songs, dances, and creative art as well as many practical ideas to enhance the celebration of Shabbat, tefillot (prayer) and hagim (holidays) in your classroom. It will also include tips on integrating Hebrew into everyday activities. Each participant will receive handouts of the songs, rhymes, and activities we learn. You will leave the session with many new ideas that you can implement into your classroom immediately. Join me for 90 minutes of early childhood enrichment fun!  

The Concept of a Personal Calling in Hassidism and Psychology  

TCB 102    Leo Michel Abrami

Do you feel you were "called" to be a Jewish educator? We shall examine the concept of "calling" in the writings of Martin Buber, an existentialist philosopher who studied the mystical doctrines of the Hassidim, Karl Gustav Jung, a leading disciple of Freud, Viktor Frankl, the initiator of Logotherapy, Abraham Maslow, who developed the concept of self-actualization. We shall show how all of them have acknowledged the role played by the personal calling, as the most important motivation in life.  

But I Don't Wanna Pray Today! Tefillah for the Tween  

TCB 104    Sarah Zollman

They're not quite jaded middle schoolers, they're no longer starry-eyed elementary schoolers. How can prayer for ten and eleven year olds be serious, joyful, and meaningful all at once? This session will include a number of techniques used in 5th and 6th grade classrooms, both at a day school and supplementary school. Tefillah journals can encourage students to reflect on the literal and personal meaning of the prayers. Songs and "competitions" can help bring joy and enthusiasm to daily prayer. Standing meditations can encourage spirituality and personal reflection during regular prayer times. Learn more about these and other techniques -- and bring your own to share!  

Write On! Creative Writing for the Experiential Classroom 

TCB 105    Aliya Cheskis-Cotel

Use creative writing to experience Jewish history in the "first person"—write Ha Lachma Anya from the perspective of a foodless child; a Tu B'Shevat piece as if you were a tree about to be destroyed; reportage of Maccabee resistance fighters in the caves; enter the Reed Sea as Nachshon; engage in a dialogue between an Arab and an Israeli youth . . . This workshop features material from the presenter’s book, Open It Up! Integrating the Arts into Jewish Education, and presents a 21st century creative learning technique that will encourage energy in students of all ages.  

 
 

TUESDAY

Experiencing Torah  

TCB 101    Joel Lurie Grishaver

Experiential education is one of the new buzz words in Jewish Education. This workshop is there to answer a very simple question, “How does one use the same foundation of classrooms and teachers to create a radically different kind of Jewish learning?” We will be working with the Torah as an example. Come experience the future.  

Yes You Can! Integrating the Arts into Practically Any Lesson Plan  

TCB 106    Jennifer Judelsohn

In this informative and inspiring session, artist and educator Jennifer Judelsohn will describe how you can use the arts as a central aspect of your teaching--and you don't have to be an artist to do it! Regardless of what subject you teach, the level of your students, or the particular setting in which you teach, you can use art as both a teaching tool and a means of assessing your students' learning. Using a myriad of examples that span the gamut from painting to drawing to sculpture, poetry and creative writing, and other means of creative expression, she will show you how and inspire you to become a more creative, dynamic teacher!  

Standing on One Foot: The Mini-MBA for Busy Jewish Educators  

TCB Seminar 2nd Floor  Deborah Grayson Riegel

What does the Harvard Business Review have to do with Jewish education? More than you know! If you’re too busy with the business of giving your students a top-notch Jewish education to keep up with the business of business, then this session is for you. Learn what the world’s leading thinkers in supervision, interpersonal communication, time management and self-awareness can teach us as Jewish educators, administrators, leaders (and human beings). Using lessons from authors such as Chip and Dan Heath, Daniel Pink, Suzy Welch, Susan Scott, Dan Ariely, and more, you’ll leave this session with a mini-MBA that yields maximum results.  

The Live Storytelling Experience: Joining In!  

TCB 212    Peninnah Schram and Cherie Karo Schwartz

Come on a storytelling adventure of discovery and rediscovery. Join Peninnah Schram and Cherie Karo Schwartz as they guide experienced and novice storytellers in techniques for drawing in the listeners in the live moment of sharing stories. Participation stories encourage active learning, activate the imagination, and fine-tune listening skills through the use of singing, call and response, sound and motion, and creative problem solving, ask and answer questions, especially in riddle stories. They will use several examples of stories where participation, involvement, and creativity help the audience join in the story and become active partners with the storyteller.  

 
 
 

TUESDAY

 

Instructional Strategies that Foster Creative and Engaging Inclusive Classrooms 

TCB 107    Dr. Sandy Miller-Jacobs

We will use various lenses (multiple intelligences, brain based strategies, differentiated instruction) to develop your skills in creating and implementing instructional strategies that foster a creative and engaging inclusive classroom for student success.  Participants will leave with a completed lesson plan that can be used as a template for future lessons.    

The Samson Cycle  

TCB 111    Everett Fox

Strong man, Nazirite, judge, and womanizer, Samson is both a breaker of vows and a hero of Israel. He is the last of the memorable figures in the book of Judges. How can we make sense of this most entertaining and puzzling of extended biblical stories? We will explore how literary tools—repetition, imagery and symbolism—can help us unlock this text in a way that can be used for other Biblical texts.  

The CHAI Curriculum: Instruction Can Get Better and Better 

TCB 211    Alan J. Levin, Ph.D.

This session would be helpful for those who have been using the Union for Reform Judaism CHAI curriculum as well as those who are considering using CHAI for the first time.  After a brief overview of the curriculum, the participants will explore ways to make CHAI their own. We will look at using CHAI with other activities and resources. Participants will examine an approach to measuring student success.  The content of the session will shift based on the interests and experiences of the participants.   

Move beyond Coping: Methods for Teaching the Holocaust 

TCB 209    Dr. Hana Bor

Teaching the Holocaust can be difficult to do. In this session, a veteran of Jewish day and congregational schools and a university educator engages us in a variety of hands-on thinking and teaching methods to confront the violence and the uniquely Jewish nature of the Holocaust with your students. We will examine the opportunity to use teaching the Holocaust as a way to address conflict, diversity and personal development. Whether you’re in Jewish, general or community education, you’ll take home examples of lesson plans that you can use from a variety of perspectives.

NewCAJE Toast And Siyyum     5:45 PM

TCB Hallway/Garden Courtyard

Join the NewCAJE board and staff for a special announcement and joyful Siyyum.

 
 
 
 

TUESDAY

AHA Presentation and A Tribute to Educators     7:15-8:15 PM

 

Stay in your seats after dinner for a better glimpse of what the American Hebrew Academy is all about. Now that you’ve had a few days to see their incredible campus and enjoy their southern hospitality, join Executive Director Glenn Drew and Director of Communications Alina Spaulding for a look at the endless potential of a co-ed pluralistic Jewish boarding school in the 21st century.

 

Then, come in close to hear three Young Professionals illuminate the life stories and professional journeys of three experienced Vatikim. These touching performances, coached by Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff, were among the most captivating moments of last year’s conference, and promise to be equally powerful this year.

Main Concert     8:30-11:00 PM

 

Temple Emanuel

Across the street from the AHA Main Gate

We came together a few short days ago, creating holy time and space with blessings and words of Torah. Tonight, we begin our Havdalah, ending as we began: with song, story, laughter, with drum and dance. Renewed and refocused, we see the path before us. Tonight we draw strength from one another as we set out on a new chapter of the journey. Leading us on that journey in the main sanctuary are Emily Aronoff and the winners of the NewVoices song competition, Linda Hirschhorn and the NewCAJE Chorale, Ellen Allard with Beth Schafer, Jordan Hill, and Sam Glaser, & if you prefer spoken word in the first half, from 8:30 to 9:30 in the Temple’s Chapel, are the full gamut of world-class storytellers: Janie Grackin, Peninnah Schram, Cherie Karo Schwartz, Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff, and Jordan Hill. Chazak V’Nitchazek, may we be strength!

Late Night – Open Mic     11:15 PM-12:15 AM

 

BEIT AM

Dining Hall

Get discovered, or just share your love of music and entertainment!

After Hours Kumsitz     12:15 AM…

 

Fire Pit

Next to Dining Hall

For those of you who’d rather sing than sleep…bring your instruments and voices!

Wednesday, August 3rd (until 1:30pm)

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

7:00–8:00 AM ---------------------------------------Shacharit (Dining Hall)

7:30-9:45 AM----------------------------------Early Checkout (Dining hall)

7:30-8:45 AM---------------------------------------------------Hot Breakfast

8:45-9:45 AM-------------------------------------------------Cold Breakfast

8:30 AM-11:45 AM----------------------------------- Sessions 6 A, B & C

9:00 AM-1:30 PM--------------------------------------------------------Expo

12:00-12:30 PM-----------------------------------------Closing Ceremonies

12:30-1:30 PM-----------------------------------------------------------Lunch

 

2:00 PM--------------------------------------------- Post-Conference Begins

2:00-6:00 PM--------------------------------------------- Intensive Session 1

6:15-7:45 PM-------------------------------------------------------------Dinner

7:45 PM---------------------------------------Mincha/Ma’ariv (Dining Hall)

7:45-8:45 PM---------------------Reflection on the Intensives & YP Time

8:45-10:15 PM---------------------------------------------Evening Programs

10:30 PM-12:00 AM-----------------------------Late Night Bar or Kumsitz

Session 6 A     8:30-11:30 AM

Holocaust Imagery: Engaging the Shoah through Art  

Science Building, 2nd Floor  Karen Dresser

A hands-on instructional class, Holocaust Imagery will allow participants to explore methods teaching Holocaust imagery through theology, contemporary artists (second generation and other), poetry and drama. A sample class will be presented through PowerPoint, academic articles, opportunities for participants to create their own artistic responses. In addition, the instructor will give myriad ideas for participants to use for organizing their own classes. Material can be adapted for middle school through high school students.  

Session 6 B     8:30-10:00 AM

Teacher Survival Kit  

TCB 101    Amy Ripps & Robin Eisenberg

Join two veteran Jewish educators for a practical session on the opportunities and challenges teachers in synagogue settings face. We’ll include topics such as planning innovative lessons, organizing your time and classroom, creating inviting learning environments, working with parents and more.  Presented in a useful and direct “Top 10” format, this session will provide teachers with the tools needed for a successful school year.   

WEDNESDAY

JUMP Math Works. How Can We Do JUMP Hebrew?  

TCB 102    Paul Solyn

Some math students conclude early on that they lack aptitude for the subject. So do some Hebrew students, and in both cases in hurts both their progress and their attitude toward school. Canadian mathematician John Mighton developed the program he calls Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies (JUMP Math) to bring almost every student to high achievement and confidence. In this session we’ll examine the principles and methods of his approach, including breaking work into exceedingly small increments, guaranteeing success, and raising the bar. We'll also strategize about ways to use the same techniques to bring all of our Hebrew students to the same high levels of confidence and achievement.  

Becoming a Jewish Storyteller  

TCB 212    Peninnah Schram

As Jewish educators/clergy/parents/young professionals, we need to integrate more storytelling into our classrooms/ pulpits/life cycle events -- and life generally. Becoming a Jewish Storyteller is an exciting on-going journey throughout life. In this session, I begin with the goal to first nourish our neshamas (souls), help identify connections to our names and Torah, and prompt retrieval of early remembered stories that affected and shaped us. We will learn more about who we are and the kinds of stories we need to learn wisdom from. We will use non-threatening participatory creative dramatic exercises, discussion, questions, and exchange of stories -- with handouts to guide us.  

 

Network 4 Good: Using Your Network for More than Just the Next Job Opportunity 

TCB 104    Lily Kowalski and Miles L. Roger

Through the Young Professionals Network of NewCAJE 1, a group of four educators from different parts of the country and levels of experience started an experiment to help with challenges faced on the job. Monthly, these educators came together to share their successes and created a support network for one another. Because of their success, they are coming back to NewCAJE 2, sharing their secrets and surprising results. We’ll share what was most beneficial to us and bring in participants who were unable to attend the conference. This is a great opportunity to create a support system with educators from all fields and across the country. Based on interest, similar support networks may be created. 

Bringing the Arts into Your Pesach Seder  

TCB 113    Lorraine Posner Arcus

"Frogs here, frogs there!" Create a child-centered meaningful Pesach Seder for young children. Enhance your Seder with easy dances, songs, props, costumes and ritual objects. Have an opportunity to make costumes, learn new dances and create unique Seder props. 

 
 
 
 

WEDNESDAY

Grantwriting: Learn How to Write an Effective Proposal 

TCB 105    Ahouva Steinhaus

What are the elements of an effective grant proposal? How can you increase your chances of being funded? We will consider the program design, goals and objectives and the timelines that help to clarify the duration and workability of your project. We will also look briefly at evaluation measures so you can determine how effective your program has been. Writing a budget for a proposal will be covered in our workshop on budgeting. 

A Call to Leadership – Jewish Educator as Jewish Leader 

TCB 106    Gavin Hirsch

There has never been a more exciting time for Jewish Education as new ideas and new support is flowing into the field. But along with this change comes new expectations. Jewish educators today are expected to be leaders in their communities, whether they are full-time professionals or part-time teachers. During this session we will explore what it means to be a leader in Jewish education, no matter what your role in Jewish Education. Using Bolman and Deal’s Four Frames of Leadership, we will identify our strengths and weaknesses as leaders and how they impact our professional lives.  

Teaching Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust to Teenagers 

TCB 107    Gerry Hecht

Teens have specific sensibilities when it comes to learning about the Holocaust. Teachers needs to be present the Holocaust in a fashion that teens can grab on to and analyze. In this workshop I will share the approach that I use with teens that de-emphasizes history and concentrates on stories, art, photographs and first-person narratives.   

Living the Legacy: Teaching Social Justice in Historical Context  

TCB 211    Etta King

Jewish education often misses the opportunity to connect young people to their heritage by failing to convey the history of our people as agents of social change. Using primary sources from the Civil Rights movement, we will highlight stories of Jews who were motivated by Jewish values to take action. We will explore strategies for teaching an inclusive history and integrating historical sources creatively into Jewish education.  

So You Told the Story – What Next?  

TCB 209    Richard Fagan

Sometimes stories can be just appreciated; sometimes we use them as triggers, or texts to be studied and discussed. How do we help our students take the next step and make meaning from stories? In this session we will apply literacy, drama, and writing techniques from secular education to representative Jewish texts and tales, and discuss how best to use them with our students. Participants will leave with a tool bag of strategies to use in formal or informal learning, and perhaps deepen their own appreciation of how stories teach. Best for teachers of 3rd grade and up, but can be adapted for younger students.  

WEDNESDAY

Conversation Café: On the Future of Supplementary School Education  

TCB 108    Open Discussion

What do you think about Jewish supplementary school education today? What are its strengths and weaknesses? How do you feel about the fact that there are a number of innovative projects afoot in the Jewish world that want to radically change how and where these schools do business or close them altogether? If you could wave your magic wand and be guaranteed of success and cooperation from all the stakeholders, what would your ideal school look like?   

Conversation Café: On Pluralism  

TCB 111    Open Discussion

NewCAJE creates a unique opportunity for Jews of all denominations to come, share and learn together. What beliefs do we hold about our fellow Jews whose worship, practice and belief are other than our own? What thoughts and feelings are stirred in you when you think another Jew does not approve of how you practice your Judaism? What steps could we take to strengthen the concept of “klal yisrael” (Jewish peoplehood)?   

Session 6 C     10:15-11:45 AM

Harnessing Community to Create Change  

TCB 101    Joanna Ware

How do we build, maintain, and leverage authentic, meaningful, powerful relationships in our work to transform the world of Jewish education? How do we identify and connect with potential, even unlikely allies? How do we translate our values and personal stories into powerful tools for creating change? This workshop will teach and explore effective tools for relational community organizing and how they can be applied to the Jewish educational world. You will leave with new skills and new ideas for how to lead initiatives that can transform Jewish education and create change in your community. You will also gain ideas for how to motivate youth and young people to act as agents of change in their communities.  

Imperfectly Perfect: Confronting the Legacy of Imperfection in our Biblical Heroes 

TCB 105    Sam Glaser

We live within the paradox that our human frailties are created by a Perfect and Benevolent Being. How can we use the examples of our role models in the Torah to enhance our understanding of ourselves? How can we choose which traits to embody? How can we guide students through sacred texts and help them to see themselves in the story? Using the Torah and Midrashim, we will learn to personalize our reading of history and enhance our lifelong quest for self-improvement.  

 
 

WEDNESDAY

Last Hope for Audacity? Jews & Politics Today  

TCB 102    Jon Wolf

The state of the political world: a fettered Obama, a mad Tea Party, Israel under siege and behaving badly; institutions in disrepute; wars and uprisings; widespread hunger and disease; economic stagnation; environmental catastrophes... How can (and should) we as Jews respond? All views and ideas are welcome.  

 

Managing, Mentoring & Meaning: Making Your Madrichim Program Work for You (& Your Teens)!  

TCB 104    Rachel Kasten

Madrichim (teenage aides) can play an important role in your religious school—assisting teachers, serving as role models for younger students, and creating a training ground for the next generation of Jewish educators. In this session, designed for administrators and madrichim coordinators in congregational schools, we will discuss managing and supervising madrichim, preparing your teachers to serve as mentors, and structuring your program to provide meaningful work for these dedicated teens. Come to MM&M ready to share your own best practices and challenges with your colleagues. Whether you have 10 or 100 madrichim in your religious school, you will walk away with tips and tricks that will fit your program.  

Aseret HaDibrot as a System for Spiritual Living  

TCB 106    Rabbi Tracee Rosen

Through literary analysis, I demonstrate that there is a very clear parallel structure to the Aseret HaDibrot (The Ten Commandments) which provides a comprehensive outline for how to live in a covenantal relationship with God & other people. Understanding these basic principles help us as human beings to actualize these ideals in our own lives.  

Boker Tov, Boker Or: Songs & Chants & So Much More!!!  

TCB 113    Ellen Allard

Ellen Allard, multi-award winning recording artist, composer, performer and educator, shares her highly successful repertoire of songs and fingerplays and chants and circle games for the early childhood classroom. Rumor has it that the songs work with elementary school kids too!  

 

Pop Culture Isn't Scary: Meeting Students Where They Are, and Making it Jewish 

TCB 107    Emilia Diamant

There's a lot of things to keep up with in pop culture today...Lady Gaga's latest outfit, the most recent reality TV sex scandal, or new social media. Come talk about some of the hot trends, and find ways to relate it to your Jewish teaching. This is a great space to talk about what's challenging you in relating to your students and find new strategies for building rapport. Come ready to laugh and learn.  

 
 

WEDNESDAY

The Nashville Number System for Songleaders  

TCB 212    Michael Kates

Learn the transcription method devised by Nashville session players to perform songs they've never played before, on the spot without rehearsal. This universal approach to song structure completely eliminates the need to transpose. Once you learn it, you'll never go back to writing conventional charts. Highly recommended for song leaders and musicians at all levels, especially useful for guitar players who use a capo.  

Spiritual and Engaging Children’s High Holiday Services: A Roadmap  

TCB 211    Jaime Lewis

With the High Holidays right around the corner, this session will provide a roadmap for creating meaningful and engaging High Holiday services for young children and their families. This interactive session is for anyone who leads or helps organize young children's High Holiday services (children ages approx. 1-7 and their parents). During the session, we will identify some of the common obstacles often facing children’s High Holiday services and how to address them. Participants will leave with concrete, detailed steps to help make their services more spiritual and engaging as well as a new, hot off the presses Rosh Hashanah song to use in their services.  

How to teach Bible to Adults  

TCB 209    Yudit Natkin

Using extracts from the Torah and the Book of Psalms, we would explore anomalies in the text using different translations and commentaries and decide on the most appropriate understanding of the text. This session can be used to deepen your own knowledge or as a study of how to teach Torah to adults.  

Conversation Café: On Life/Work Balance and Success   

TCB 108    Open Discussion

Why did you choose to become a Jewish educator? What do you hope to accomplish in your professional life?  In your personal life?  Are you able to balance both as a Jewish educator?  Why or why not? Reflect on your everyday work. What are your successes? What are the obstacles you face when you try to achieve your goals? How can you achieve more personal and professional success going forward?  

Conversation Café: On Advocacy  

TCB 111    Open Discussion

Discuss: The value and priority given to Jewish education and Jewish educators within the North American Jewish community. What do you think about it? What do you feel about it? What are you inspired to do about it? Do you believe there is a role NewCAJE can play in advocacy for Jewish education and Jewish educators?

 
 
 

WEDNESDAY

Closing Ceremonies – MAKOM     12:00-12:30 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

Join together with Cherie Karo Schwartz, Sam Glaser and Cherie Koller-Fox as we leave the holy space that we have created at NewCAJE with songs, a story, and blessings for the new school year ahead.

Post-Conference Intensives -- Wednesday, August, 3rd and Thursday, August 4th

Post-Conference Intensives

 

For those of you just couldn’t get enough of NewCAJE! Seven in-depth sessions for seven hours over the course of two days, with world-class masters in their fields.

Session 1     2:00-6:00 PM

An Intensive on Bible with Rabbi Dr. Yosef Leibowitz

TCB 104

In this intensive, Rabbi Dr. Leibowitz will focus on the struggles of the Jews in the desert as seen in the book of Exodus. We will carefully read the text to better understand the events that led up to Sinai, the revelation itself and the events that followed including the Golden Calf and the giving of the second set of tablets. These texts contain challenging words and ideas. Why did God need a mountain? What was Moses’ real task? What exactly did Moses “place before the children of Israel”? We will look closely at the text and learn the skills necessary to read and understand it.

 

Rabbi Dr. Yosef Leibowitz is the director and founder of the Yad Yaakov Fund. He received ordination from Yeshiva University and a doctorate from University of California at Berkeley. He currently lives in Israel where he has taught at the Pardes Institute for Jewish Studies. He has run the Torah education program for the city of Kfar Sabaand served there as rabbi of Minyan Hachadash. He teaches Torah on line and in scholar in residence programs across America.

 
 

An Intensive on Educational Leadership: Staff Development for Experienced Religious School Directors with Diane Zimmerman

TCB 105

Everything Counts: Building an Outstanding Staff

Your school is as good as the teachers on your staff. You provide them with a curriculum, lesson plans and perhaps even a scope and sequence for the year. But what does it really take to lead your staff to excellence? How DOES the principal create a staff that cares

WEDNESDAY

 

about students and the school, strives to prepare and lead excellent lessons AND raises the bar for learning in your school? This takes an experienced educational director who knows that “everything counts” from hiring, staff workshops, emails, available resources, weekly supervision and staff oversight. Participants will leave this intensive with plans in hand to elevate the quality of teaching and learning in their schools—including a plan for teacher orientation and an outline for a “hands-on”  staff development workshop.

 

Diane Zimmerman, Associate Director of Religious Education, Temple Sinai, Washington DC, is primarily responsible for teacher training and professional development. She has been an educational leader for over 20 years, as director of supplementary schools, chairperson of the Education Directors Council in DC, and as a workshop presenter. Diane researched avocational teachers in an important study published in Jewish Education News. She learned a great deal about the teachers who work in Jewish education and this research informs her work and her teaching. She specializes in leading interactive, practical, on-target workshops for teachers and principals.

An Israel Intensive with Rabbi Fred Guttman

TCB 106

In this intensive you will learn the background (from the birth of Zionism to today’s headlines) for current events that will enable you to answer the questions that your students ask about Israel. This course will cover reasons Jewish nationalism arose and the challenges that idea it has faced since its inception.  You will learn about Israel’s wars and about the process for peace that it has been engaged in since Oslo. What is the role of the Arab world in Israel’s story? What role do the Great Powers like the United States play?  What about recent events such as the rise of J Street and the Arab spring? This intensive will help you put Israeli history, politics and ideology into context.

 

From 1979 to 1991, Rabbi Guttman was the rabbi and principal of Alexander Muss High School—a study abroad program in Israel for High School students which is designed to help them develop a deep appreciation of Israel’s history and its place on the world stage. Currently, he is serving as the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in Greensboro, North Carolina where his many accomplishments include moving confirmation to the 12th grade and making sure that most of his students visit Israel in High School.

In addition to his Rabbinical Ordination from Hebrew Union College in 1979, he has a Masters Degree in Hebrew Literature from Hebrew Union College and a Masters of Education from the University of North Florida. In 2004, he was awarded a Doctorate of Divinity from Hebrew Union College.

He has been the chair of the Israel/Foreign Affairs subcommittee of the Commission of Social Action for Reform Judaism and has been instrumental in helping draft several significant Union for Reform Judaism resolutions, including resolutions on torture and human rights.

 

 

WEDNESDAY

A Prayer Intensive WITH Joel Grishaver

TCB 101

From his very first book, Shema is for Real, Joel has always been passionate about prayer. He is currently writing a book about the Midrash in prayer, and in this intensive he will provide a toolbox to help you teach prayer in a meaningful way. He will keep you on your toes and by the end of the session you will have a much deeper understanding of the prayers and how to convey them to your students.

 

Joel Grishaver is a Jewish writer, teacher, cartoonist and storyteller. In 1981, he and two friends started Torah Aura Productions. Joel was a founding member of CAJE and a winner of the Covenant Award.

 

An Intensive on Technology for the Classroom wITH Dr. David Mandel

TBC 115 (and TCB 100)

In this intensive you will have an opportunity to see and use the best technology available for the classroom today. This workshop will have a hands-on component allowing you to work on a project for your own classroom. You will see many examples of how to use this technology to teach subject matter and to use it to communicate with your students and between home and school. There will also be a discussion and demonstration of social media and it uses.

 

Dr. David Mandel is the Dean of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer at the American Hebrew Academy. Coming, most recently from corporate America, Dr. David Mandel has always been involved in how information is used and stored for the present and the future.  He has most recently specialized in intellectual property analytics and innovation assessment, working at companies (including Xerox and EDS) that are using cutting edge technology in the field of information extraction.  Dr. Mandel also had his own business for 15 years creating applications for universities, small businesses and corporations.  In addition, he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut, developed and taught computer literacy courses at the University of New York at Buffalo for over ten years and has conducted courses for public school teachers on computer use. The work that he is engaged with now at AHA has top of the line educational technology and uses it to enhance both Jewish and general studies.

 
 

An intensive on Integrating the Arts into Jewish Education WITH Marge Eiseman & Aliya Cheskis-Cotel and the Arts Staff

TCB 113

Marge and Aliya will lead you on a quest to strengthen the way we use the arts in our schools and to deepen the ways you integrate them into your curricula. Together with a team of talented members of the NewCAJE arts community, they will bring you many

 

WEDNESDAY

 

new skills to add to your toolbox in Drama, Bibliodrama, Creative Writing, Art, Dance, Music and Storytelling. Several of the presenters are authors of the noted book, Open It Up! Integrating the Arts in Jewish Education.

 

Marge Eisman: Storahtelling Maven, Singer/songwriter, friend, teacher, spiritual leader, free-lance writer, creative force, student, guide, inspirational speaker and so much more...Marge shares songs, stories and life's lessons with humor and depth.

 

Aliya Cheskis-Cotel: The recipient of a Gruss Award for Teaching Excellence, Aliya is a folk dancer, guitarist, former actor and singer. She specializes in creative curricula, arts programs and creative writing. She is the co-author of Open It Up! Integrating Arts into Jewish Education.

 

 

An Intensive on Bible with Professor Everett Fox

TCB 107

Leaders in the Book of Samuel: Good Models or Bad Models?

The book of Samuel doesn’t only tell how Israel came to have kings, but concentrates on the problems and pitfalls of leadership—something we worry about a great deal today. We will do a close reading of this gripping book in translation, paying attention to the reactions of kings and prophets to the dilemmas they face.

 

Dr. Everett Fox is Allen M. Glick Professor of Judaic and Biblical Studies and Director of the Program in Jewish Studies at Clark University in Worcester, MA. He received his undergraduate and graduate training at Brandeis University, and taught at Boston University before coming to Clark in 1986. He is the author of a number of studies on biblical narrative and translation, including The Five Books of Moses: A New Translation with Introductions, Commentary, and Notes, which was published by Schocken Books in 1995, and Give Us a King! A New Translation of the Book of Samuel, which appeared in 1999. His annotated translation of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings (The Early Prophets) is nearing completion. In addition to his academic duties, Prof. Fox served as a religious consultant to DreamWorks on the animated film The Prince of Egypt. Prof. Fox lectures widely on the Bible and is active in adult Jewish education. He has many presentations at CAJE conferences over the years, and taught for a decade in Boston’s Me’ah Program.

Young Professional Intensive

TCB Seminar 2nd Floor

Sessions lead by members of the Young Professional co-chairs and members of the YP track on issues of vision, advocacy, NewCAJE future leadership, networking and more.

 
 
 

WEDNESDAY

Reflection on the Intensives and YP Time              7:45-8:45 PM

 

Share highlights of what you learned in the first day of the intensive, and see what a community of study can be all about.

Evening Programs     8:45-10:15 PM

 

Beit Am

Dining Hall

Join in story, song and talent lead by the Young Professional entertainers and others.

Late Night Bar or Kumsitz     10:30 PM-12:00 AM

 

Marriott Hotel Bar or the Fire Pit

Outside the Dining Hall

 

Take your car (and a designated driver) and let loose with a hard or soft drink at the Marriott Bar and lounge, or stay to sing all night with your friends at the fire pit.

 
 
 
 
 
 

For those leaving today—we hope you had an awesome experience at NewCAJE 2011.

 

Watch your e-mail for NewCAJE activities and learning opportunities throughout the year, and most important, information about next year’s conference—NewCAJE 2012!

 

THURSDAY

 

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

7:00–8:00 AM ---------------------------------------Shacharit (Dining Hall)

7:45-8:45 AM------------------------------------Hot Breakfast & Checkout

9:00-12:00 PM------------------------------------------ Intensives Session 2

12:00-12:45 PM----------------------------------------------------------Lunch

1:00 PM--------------------------------------------------Leave AHA Campus

Session 2     9:00 AM-12:00 PM

 

The second half of yesterday’s intensives. Learn, simmer, reflect.

Presenter Bios

WHO’S WHO AT NewCAJE?  

Lisa Aamodt has had the pleasure of working as both a formal and informal Jewish Educator for the past nine years. She is currently affiliated with Temple Beth Torah, Merrick Jewish Centre, Midway Jewish Center, and Jewish Congregation of Brookville. She works as a classroom educator for grades 3rd-7th and run various Youth and Family Programs for grades 3rd-12th.

 

Leo Michel Abrami is an ordained Rabbi and an instructor in Judaic studies and logotherapy. He has published several books in French and in English and has contributed to 'The Dead Sea Scrolls Uncovered' R. Eisenman and 'Best Writings 2003' edited by A. Kurzweil. 

Ellen Allard is a multi-award winning Recording Artist, Composer, and Early Childhood Music Specialist. Ellen is one half of a duo with Peter Allard, their discography includes nine CDs and five songbooks. Ellen has taught at HUC, is on the faculty of the North American Jewish Choral Festival and Hava Nashira, and has led family services at the URJ Biennial, CAJE and NewCAJE. Ellen is a graduate of Boston University, with a Bachelor's degree in Music. She earned her Master's degree in Early Childhood Education at Arcadia University.

 

Nachum Amsel works with Berel Wein and the Destiny Foundation, “to bring Jewish history to life in an exciting, entertaining, interactive way.” Rabbi Dr. Amsel has taught thousands of teachers to be more effective, and has worked in all areas of Jewish education, developing numerous curricula including a methodology on how to teach Jewish Values using media.

 

Emily Aronoff is a Jewish Music educator and early childhood specialist. She believes wholeheartedly in the power of informal education and utilizes music as her tool of choice.

 

Noah Aronson is an energetic and soulful composer/performer. While studying Jazz Composition at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Noah was Composer-in-Residence at Temple Beth Elohim in Wellesley, MA. He teaches in synagogues around the country and has performed with Josh Nelson, Dan Nichols and Craig Taubman. In September 2011, Noah will rejoin the Temple Beth Elohim for a year-long residency and has the privilege of serving as the Assistant Music Director for the URJ Biennial in December.

 

Tamara Beliak has been teaching for ten years in High School supplemental and Middle School Day School programs. This is her third CAJE conference. She finished her dissertation “Teacher approaches to studying texts with sexual content in Middle School Tanach classrooms” at Yeshiva University’s Azrieli program. As a researcher, Tamara interviewed teachers about teaching stories of King David and Samson.

Josh Bender has been Director of Education at Adas Israel in Washington, DC since 2007. He holds a Masters in Jewish Education from Baltimore Hebrew University which included an administrative and teaching internship at Krieger Schechter Day School in Baltimore. He earned a BA in English with a minor in Jewish Studies from Penn State University. Prior to coming to Adas Israel, he served as Education Director and Principal at Beth Am Synagogue in Baltimore for seven years and worked part-time as Director of Graduate Services at Hillel of Greater Baltimore. Josh has extensive experience in both informal and formal Jewish education and leads musical family and children’s services for all ages. He is a past chair of the Baltimore Principal’s Council, has presented at the United Synagogue’s New Director’s Institute in NY, and is part of the planning committee for the Young Professional post-conference and NewCAJE.

 

Marcy Berger has been Principal of the Temple Beth David Religious School for four years. She has worked extensively with her teachers on mindful planning and extending their Jewish content knowledge. Marcy is a certified teacher in the state of New York and holds a Masters of Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

 

William Berkson, Ph.D., is the Director of the Jewish Institute for Youth and Family. He has led development of the Becoming a Mentsh workshops, and now the Becoming a Mentsh classes on Peer-to-Peer Ethics and on Shalom Bayit (parent teen relations). He is author of the recently published Pirke Avot: Timeless Wisdom for Modern Life (JPS).

 

Eyal Bor, Ph.D., is instrumental in developing innovative educational programs used throughout the U.S., such as:  Project Mishpacha; Chavurah Chadasha, small family groups study together; Gesher L’Tikvah, a program to assist students with dyslexia and/or learning disabilities.  Dr. Bor is a professor of Hebrew Language at Towson University and is married to Dr. Hana Bor, Professor of Education at Towson University.

  

Dr. Hana Bor is a Towson University (Baltimore, MD) associate professor of Jewish Education and Director of the Masters of Arts and certificate programs in Jewish Education and Jewish Communal Services. Dr. Bor teaches leadership, administration, and teaching methods to entering and veteran educators, including courses on culture, and how to teach diversity, Israel and the Holocaust.

 

Gail Bretan is the Volunteer Coordinator for Jewish Family Services in Greensboro, NC. She is completing her PhD in Education Studies & Cultural Foundations from the University of North Carolina – Greensboro and is writing her dissertation about an Adult Jewishly-Informed Service-Learning Model she is developing and implementing at JFS.

 

Lee Brice, M. Ed, has been the Director of Education at Congregation Gates of Heaven for nine years, working with Rabbis, teachers and congregants to create opportunities for Jewish learning at all ages. She supervises a Madrikhim program of 46 teens, grades 8-12, which accepts all applicants and seeks to develop their potential.

 
 
 
 

Aliya Cheskis-Cotel founded Kolot Management, a Jewish arts management company representing Joel Chasnoff, Linda Hirschhorn, Vocolot, Wayne Dosick, Kol B'Seder, Naomi Less, Daniel Asia, and Hamapah. Aliya proudly directed her husband, Rabbi Moshe Cotel's (z”l) performance program, Chronicles: A Jewish Life at the Classical Piano. She is a Gruss Award recipient for Teaching Excellence, co-author of OPEN IT UP! Integrating the Arts into Jewish Education, and the study guide to Golda’s Balcony. Aliya also dedicates herself to special needs and enrichment Judaic learning for students 7 to 70. She has served on the Social and Communal Programming Team for Limmud NY for 3 years and has been a proud invited presenter at Limmud UK, Limmud NY, Limmud Chicago, and CAJE and NewCAJE for 12 years.

 

Phil Cohen has served as a pulpit Rabbi, educator, Hillel director, and college professor. His current interests include the struggle for the meaning of God in our time, and food and the Jewish tradition. His own struggle has included the continuing search for authentic meaning and the attempt to engage others.

 

Emilia Diamant was born and raised in the Boston area. As a product of Congregation Beth El of Sudbury and NFTY/URJ Camps, she has always had a strong link to Jewish education. This link was formalized two years ago as she began a job at Temple Beth Or in Raleigh, NC. She is thrilled to be back at NewCAJE!

 

Lauren Jane Dragutsky attended Day school from when she was 3-18. After studying Human Development/Family Studies at Indiana University she came home to Los Angeles. She soon began teaching preschool at Kehillat Israel Early Childhood center where she teaches to this day. She teaches the 2 year olds and she find her job fun, nurturing and anything but boring!

 

Karen Dresser is immersed in the arts both in her teaching and her own art. Her focus ranges from Holocaust imagery to artistic midrash on Jewish texts; she employs her own artistic inquiries as she teaches a range of students from high school to masters level in the classroom. Karen is also a poet, playwright, actor, singer/songwriter.

 

Jonina Duker (a.k.a. Taibel bas Rachel Leah v'Shlomo Yehoshua) presented at IAJGS, CAJE, Limmud NY, MANAJE, and NHC conferences. The 63rd North Carolina B’nai B’rith Institute of Judaism invited her as one of three 2010 scholars. She teaches genealogy, basic Judaism, history, literature, liturgy, text in translation, and history. She helped found Kulanu.  She was a CAJE Life Member.

 

Marge Eiseman is an "unordained rabbi" -- a spiritually creative person who writes songs, leads services, dreams up programs, counsels compassion and teaches anyone who wants to learn, in whatever modality works for you. She combats cynics and brings joy and music to communities everywhere. And, she’s a trained Storytelling Maven, with an MA in Jewish Education from Siegal College.

 

Jill Eisen's Jewish education passion came as an epiphany at Gamla, an ancient city in Israel; She was meant to teach families the wonders of Judaism. Since then she earned two Masters, started Chavurot and a satellite Hebrew School and empowered families to explore what it means to be Jewish. She is the Assistant Principal in a congregation religious school.

Robin Eisenberg has served as Director of Jewish Learning and Living at Temple Beth El in Boca Raton, Florida for 28 years. She is past President of the National Association of Temple Educators and currently serves as the Accreditation co-chair. Robin's passions are mentoring young professionals and staff development in formal and informal settings.

 

Richard Fagan is a Rabbi/Torah teacher and Education Consultant working in Staff and Curriculum Development, Moral Education, and spirituality/mussar. He has been associated with the Auerbach Central Agency for Jewish Education, the NESS program, and the Penn Literacy Network. He is also the original author of the “take the MTV Challenge” curriculum, a storyteller, and dulcimer player.

 

David Feder is Dean of Jewish Life at the American Hebrew Academy, a job he shares with his wife Adinah Miller. David teaches Jewish history, Zionism, and Israel, as well as leading a wide range of alternative t’fillot options at the academy, from Torah study to Jews in Canoes. He is the author of an innovative Haggadah (as yet unpublished) and academic work on the murder of Chaim Arlosoroff.

 

Jonathon Feinberg was a 2003 BYFI and 2010 PresenTense/CJP Boston Fellow, received a BA in Environmental Studies from Oberlin College in 2008, and has been involved in environmental education since. He will begin a Master's program at Tufts this fall. Jonathon is the US Coordinator for Israel-based Jewish Environmental education group Sviva Israel.

 

Efraim Feinstein holds a B.Sc. in physics from McGill University and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Harvard University, where he works as postdoctoral researcher. He is a computer programmer and Jewish liturgy geek who co-directs and acts as lead developer of the Open Siddur Project (http://opensiddur.org). He lives in Cambridge, MA, with his wife, Eve.

 

Everett Fox is Allen M. Glick Professor of Judaic and Biblical Studies at Clark University, where he heads the Program in Jewish Studies. He is the translator of The Five Books of Moses, and his annotated translation of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings (The Early Prophets) is nearing completion.

 

Sam Glaser has been named one of the top ten Jewish artists in the US by Moment magazine. He has released 22 CDs, performs in over 50 cities each year and has appeared at such venues as L.A.'s Greek Theater, Gibson Amphitheater, Staples Center and Dodger Stadium as well as on Broadway and at the White House.

 

Deborah Goldstein is a religious school teacher at Beth Meyer Synagogue in Raleigh North Carolina. She has been teaching children from preschool through high school for the last 20 years. In a previous life Deborah worked with emotionally disturbed adolescents in a residential program in Northampton, Ma.  Although Deborah is a long time CAJEnik, this is her first opportunity to collaborate in a presentation and she feels honored to be asked to share what she has learned from her teachers and students with other teachers.

 
 
 

Rabbi Janie Grackin uses the art of storytelling to inspire and educate. She creates programs for synagogues and schools in the United States, England and Israel, including “Being Torah Alive!”, a cutting edge approach to teaching Torah. 2005 Solomon Schechter Gold Award Family Education, co-chair of CAJE Jewish Storytelling Network. www.janiegrackin.com

 

Lauren B. Granite, Ph.D., is Centropa's US Education Director. Lauren has a doctorate in the Sociology of Religion from Drew University. She received her Master of Philosophy Degree in Religious Studies from the University of Chicago, and her Bachelor of Arts Degree from the New York University. Lauren brings to Centropa 15 years of experience educating students in universities and colleges, high school, congregational schools and adult education settings. She’s created and taught courses in Jewish history, women in Judaism, comparative religions, diaspora Jewish communities, and Jewish culture. She currently lives in the Washington, DC area.

 

Deborah Grayson Riegel is Head Coach of MyJewishCoach, and helps individuals and organizations achieve “Success without the Tsuris” through coaching and workshops. Her unique approach combines cognitive behavioral psychology, adult learning, and improv comedy. Deborah is a Professor of Communications at Peking University, China. Deborah writes a syndicated coaching column for North American Jewish newspapers.

 

Zerach Greenfield has been teaching the art of STAM for over 30 years. He has developed numerous programs that bring the scribal arts to life for all ages. Born in USA, he made Aliyah in 1980, and now splits his time between the two.

 

Joel Lurie Grishaver is the creative chair of Torah Aura Productions and has written dozens of books that create cutting edge Jewish learning. He tells stories, teaches texts, and creates transformative experiences.

 

Marcia Gruss Levinsohn is Founder/Director of the Jewish Educational Workshop, a Board member of Yiddish of Greater Washington, and published three Yiddish Picture Books for beginning students. She teaches Yiddish Conversation classes for Seniors, and has presented at CAJE, IAYC, Early Childhood Conferences, Brother/Sisterhoods, and Ethnic/Book Fairs.

 

Eitan Gutin is currently serving as the Director of Lifelong Learning for Tifereth Israel in DC and has been an educator in many Jewish venues. He specializes in matters of Tefillah and spirituality and is currently studying to be a Maggid, one who uses stories to connect other Jews with God. Eitan, his wife Aviva, and their son Lev live in MD.

 

Fred Guttman has served as the rabbi of Temple Emanuel in Greensboro since 1995. From 1979 to 1991, Rabbi Guttman lived in Israel and served as the rabbi and principal of AMHSI. Fred has worked in Holocaust curriculum development since 1979. He has been a regional director of the March of the Living and has attended 10 “Marches.”

 

Nancy Guttman has been a successful marriage and family therapist for more than 30 years in both Israel and the United States. She studies the Parasha weekly and as a baby boomer herself, has been moved by the lessons for baby boomers found in Numbers, a text not often know for its great wisdom.

Gerry Hecht has been a synagogue educator for more than 15 years. He has taught high school at Temple Beth Abraham for 10 years, at the United Jewish Center in Danbury, CT for 4 years, and at Temple B'nai Israel in Southbury, CT for 4 years.

 

Donna Hendel is a Jewish educator from Florida with a recent Master's Degree in Jewish Studies. Relocating two years ago to Philadelphia, PA, she added to her religious school and Hebrew school teaching positions by driving around to various synagogue preschools to teach Israeli dancing to Jewish Early Childhood Centers. That's her new joy and total passion!

 

Jordan Hill is a storyteller and dramatic educator for whom high-energy storytelling is inextricably bound to his extensive teaching in just about all types of Jewish educational venues. He now teaches at Tucson’s Jewish Day School and Hebrew High yet slips into a metaphorical phone booth to fly around the country to weave wonders, turn tales, and teach storytelling.

 

Gavin Hirsch has held a variety of positions in both formal and informal Jewish education as a part-time and full-time employee and ranging in ages from preschool to 12th grade. He recently received his master degree in Jewish Education from HUC in New York and has accepted a position at Temple Beth El in Boca Raton, Florida.

 

Cantor Linda Hirschhorn is the director, founder and primary composer for Vocolot. She has released two songbooks and eight recordings of original material (four with Vocolot). Her songs and choral arrangements have been published in major folk anthologies, are performed by professional and amateur groups around the world and have been used in video, radio documentaries and dance scores. Linda organized and directed the first Jewish Women's International Chorus in Kiev (1994). Linda has been Cantor at Temple Beth Sholom, San Leandro, CA since 1988, and was one of the founding members of Kehilla Community Synagogue in Berkeley.

 

Jennifer Judelsohn is a licensed clinical psychotherapist, artist, educator and speaker. Her mission is to assist others in leading a more soulful life. Jennifer is the author/illustrator of Songs of Creation: Meditations on the Sacred Hebrew Alphabet.  Recently, she’s been working on a drawings inspired by Debbie Friedman’s music (z\"l).

 

Liat Kadosh is the Hebrew Language Director at The Epstein School (Middle School) in Atlanta, Georgia and a Hebrew language instructor at Emory U. She is on staff at Hebrew at the Center. Liat coordinated Hebrew language instruction support for students with special needs at Gann Academy.  She holds a BA and Educational Leadership Diploma from Bar Ilan University and an MA in Jewish Education from Siegal College.

 

Cathy Kaplan works at Beth Meyer Religious School where she teaches 4th grade Judaics and serves as the School Administrator.  For the past several years, she has also been the Cubmaster for the Scout pack at the synagogue.  Working in an environment where her two wonderful children spend so much of their time gives her great pleasure.  She is looking forward to sharing her experiences in the classroom with other teachers.

 

Cherie Karo Schwartz, Storyteller, Author, Educator, celebrates forty years of sharing spirit-filled wisdom stories, workshops, keynotes, and presentations for all ages throughout the world. She tells and teaches for conferences, synagogues, museums, libraries, schools. Author: three books, numerous articles, co-founding coordinator of CAJE Storytelling Network, weaver of words and rituals; Cherie has always lived in stories.

 

Rachel Kasten serves as the Assistant Director of Education & Youth Programs at Isaac M. Wise Temple in Cincinnati. She is from Raleigh, NC, where she worked as an educator in two congregations and as Camp Director at the JCC. Rachel holds a BA in Sociology from NC State and a certificate in Nonprofit Management from Duke U.

 

Helene Kates is best known as a singer and songwriter with the Baal Shem Tones.  She is also a much-beloved music, drama and dance specialist in the Atlanta Jewish schools. She offers a variety of workshops in music, movement, healing and community building for all ages. www.baalshemtones.com

 

Michael Kates played keyboards for legendary NJ rockers The Decos, was a regular in New York's jazz scene in the 1970s and studied improvisation under the late Sal Mosca for nine years. He tours and records with his wife Helene as The Baal Shem Tones, produces other artists and teaches music.

 

Etta King is the Education Program Manager at the Jewish Women's Archive, where she develops and promotes JWA's educational programs. Active for 13 years in Habonim Dror and a graduate of Brandeis Univeristy, she has experience in informal and formal education and has taught all ages from preschool to adults.

 

Cherie Koller-Fox is a founder and past president of CAJE and served as chair of its Advocacy Commission. She has written and spoken extensively about family education, innovation in Jewish education, and spiritual practices. Along with Everett Fox, she has established the Ezra Institute to promote the study and teaching of Bible. Cherie is the Rabbi of the Chapel Minyan and is practicing the art of chaplaincy. She is now a founder (once more) and president of NewCAJE and is the conference facilitator this year. She is married to Everett Fox and they have 3 children: Akiva, Leora and Ezra.

 

Eric Komar started out over 20 years ago as a NFTY songleader.  He performs concerts, retreats, and artist-in-residence weekends throughout North America. He has three CDs of original folk- and jazz-tinged Jewish rock. He also teaches religious school music and Hebrew language, does music typesetting and transcription, and teaches guitar. Eric lives in NJ with his wife and two children.

 

Lily Kowalski graduated from Brandeis University with a B.A. in Judaic Studies and Music. Since then, she has held jobs at 6 different organizations, working with children ages 2 to 18. She has taught many different topics, including Hebrew, Jewish holidays, Pirkei Avot; facilitated discussions utilizing popular media; and loves sharing Israeli dance and Jewish music with her students.

 

Lisa Lasovsky was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa. She has a BS in Early Childhood, and has taught in Preschools and Kindergarten classrooms in South Africa and the USA for 20 years. She teaches at B'nai Shalom Day School in Greensboro, NC and leads children's services at Beth David Synagogue.

 

Rabbi Dr. Yosef Leibowitz is the director and founder of the Yad Yaakov Fund. He received ordination from Yeshiva University and a doctorate from University of California at Berkeley. He currently lives in Israel where he has taught at the Pardes Institute for Jewish Studies. He has run the Torah education program for the city of Kfar Saba and served there as rabbi of Minyan Hachadash. He teaches Torah on line and in scholar in residence programs across America.

 

Alan J. Levin Ph.D. is an Education Specialist with the Union for Reform Judaism. Previously he has worked in the public schools as an Assistant Superintendent for Instruction and as a Director of Special Services. He has been Educator in small and large congregational schools. Alan directed the development of the CHAI curriculum.

 

Jaime Lewis is a performer and pre-school music teacher in New York City and Long Island. She works with synagogues to create Jewish holiday programs. She created the Minyan Katan High Holiday Helper service, sold internationally and cross-denominationally. She has 2 original children’s CDs that are currently on the market.

 

Rabbi Larry Milder's Bluegrass Bible is best described as a unique combination of influences. One of the outstanding flatpickers in American Jewish music, Larry is also a composer of finely crafted musical midrash. Larry recently took up residence as the Reform Rabbi of the American Hebrew Academy.

 

Hal Miller-Jacobs makes Torah come alive as a reporter for The Canaan Times, interviewing participants who take on roles of Torah characters. This Bibliodrama-based technique is particularly effective with kids. Hal's life’s work is making technology user-friendly and does the same with Torah & Tefilah.

 

Sandy Miller-Jacobs serves Hebrew College in Boston as Professor and Director of Jewish Special Education Academic Programs. She taught for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation then joined the faculty of Fitchburg State College, where she served as a professor in the Special Education Department for 28 years, including six years as Department Chair and two years as the College's Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs & Dean of Academic Personnel. She earned her BA from Queens College, CUNY, M.Ed. from Boston University and Ed.D. from Boston College.

 

Yudit Natkin has been a teacher of Hebrew and Jewish Studies for many years - Herzlia Day School in Cape Town; and adult Education in Louisville KY as well as Greensboro NC. For 10 years (1990-2000). She was teaching Hebrew in the Religious Studies Department at the University of Greensboro as well. She is now retired, but teaching Adults at Beth David Synagogue.

 

Lorraine Arcus teaches kindergarten and Israeli dance in Albany, NY, and is a recipient of the 2001 Covenant Award for Outstanding Creative Jewish Educators. She is the Author of Torah Alive! An Experiential Approach to Teach Torah to Young Children and Zman Lirkod - A Manual For Teaching Israeli Dance.

 

Paul Radensky is the Museum Educator for Jewish Schools at the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. He develops seminars for teachers and yemei iyyun for students in conjunction with Museum exhibits. Paul completed his Ph.D. in Jewish history at JTS and lives in Manhattan with his wife Laura, and four children.

 

Rabbi Imanuel Ravad has for the past 30 years dedicated himself to Global Mikva Outreach campaigns with the recommendation of G'dolei Hador – our generation's rabbinic leadership and with stunning results. He recently arrived from Israel and drove his world famous Mikva Outreach mobile billboard from NY to LA loaded with tons of Mikva Outreach educational material. He may be one of the only people to attend (nearly) every CAJE and NewCAJE conference.

 

Lori Riegel has been involved in Jewish education for 21 years, the last 3 as the education Director at Temple Emanu-El. Lori is the recipient of the Southern Arizona Outstanding Jewish Educator of the Year Award, the Gerald and Marion Gendell Award for Excellence in Jewish Education and the Grinspoon-Steinhardt Award for Excellence in Jewish Education.

 

Amy Ripps is the Director of Education and Youth Programs at Beth Meyer Synagogue in Raleigh, NC, where she also served as lay-Rabbi for one year.  Prior to relocating to North Carolina almost 20 years ago, Amy was based in the Washington, D.C., area where she held a number of education and youth-related positions at Reform and Conservative congregations.  She chaired CAJE 31 at Duke University and has presented at numerous conferences.

 

Miles Roger has been teaching in Jewish schools for the past 13 years. Since 2009, Miles worked for the Bureau of Jewish Education in Indianapolis, starting as Program Director and now serves as Assistant Director. At the Bureau, Miles focuses on adult and family education, Holocaust education, and Hebrew School operations while also working on marketing and technology.

 

Tracee Rosen is rabbi of Temple Gan Elohim in Glendale, AZ and middle school Judaic Studies instructor at Pardes JSA Day School in Phoenix. She was ordained at the Ziegler School at AJU, and has served pulpits in Los Angeles and Salt Lake City. She and her life partner, Keren Goldberg have a daughter, Meital.

 

Anna Salomon has worked in formal and informal Jewish education for over 12 years. She is currently teaching at New Orleans Jewish Day School and is pursuing a Doctoral degree in Jewish Education Leadership. Anna received her MAT from Brandeis in the DeLeT program. She is actively involved in her school, synagogue, and local community.

 
 
 

Deborah Salomon is an innovative creator of the Hebrew Wizards school and congregation. Her just released curriculum of Jewish knowledge is now available to educate and stimulate children, Teens and Families. Morah Deborah intermingles the spirit of summer camp with the concrete learning of traditional Hebrew school to offer a fresh new approach to Jewish education.

 

Peninnah Schram, storyteller, is Speech and Drama Professor, Yeshiva University’s Stern College. Vibrantly elegant storytelling, Peninnah tells Jewish stories of wisdom and wit. Her books include THE HUNGRY CLOTHES AND OTHER JEWISH FOLKTALES and a CD, THE MINSTREL & THE STORYTELLER, with singer/guitarist Gerard Edery. Recipient: Covenant Award for Outstanding Jewish Educator and 2003 National Storytelling Network’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

Neil Schwartz is the "Kol Bo" Hazzan of a small Canadian synagogue. He teaches Cantillation and Nusach HaT'fillah online through Hebrew College. Neil has presented at many CAJE Conferences, and he has taught the United Synagogue IMUN Program for lay religious leaders. He also helps develop teaching materials for chanting Jewish liturgy with Kinnor Software.

 

Susan Shane-Linder is an award-winning singer, songwriter, published composer, and recording artist. She is well known and has presented and performed at numerous workshops in early childhood programs, summer camps and many national organizations including CAJE & NAEYC. Susan has taught and performed for the South Florida Jewish community for thirty years. Susan has three CDs. www.singinwithsusan.com

 

Liz Singer is the Religious School Director at Temple Emanuel in St. Louis. Liz utilized her community organizing education in this past year when her school exploded, growing by 60%. Though there is no promise of similar results, she will offer a unique perspective from a new administrator that was faced with some extraordinary circumstances.

 

Adam Soclof is Media & Marketing Associate for JTA, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. A University of Michigan alum, Adam was a two-year Schusterman Insight Fellow in New York and a PresenTense Fellow. He has taught at the Nesiya Institute, Camp Stone and the Hebrew Day School of Ann Arbor. Adam is currently an advisor to Bible Raps.

 

Paul Solyn is the director of the Jewish Community School in Elmira, NY. He holds a master's degree and family educator certificate from Hebrew College, Boston.

 

Ahouva Steinhaus is a financial advisor, educational consultant and Secretary of San Diego Earthworks. Her CAJE claim to fame is that she taught at the first conference at Brown University in 1975 and has continued to develop innovative educational curriculum ever since. She has been an activist and teacher in the service of Jewish Renewal for 40+ years. Her areas of expertise include career and retirement planning, and she helps people discover how to make the most of their money.

 

Adam Tilove is a graduate of Emory University, Brooklyn College, and the Pardes Educators' Program.  He completed the Educational Leadership Advancement Initiative and the Day School Leadership Training Institute, and won the Grinspoon-Steinhardt award in 2009.  He is currently the Chair of Jewish Studies and Hebrew for the Rodeph Sholom School in Manhattan.

 

Joanna Ware is Keshet’s Lead Organizer and Training Coordinator. They employ grassroots community organizing strategies to build powerful communities of people working for the full inclusion of LGBT people in the Jewish world. Joanna educates and trains Jewish educators to become leaders for LGBT inclusion. She brings experience in Jewish youth work, informal education, anti-violence and anti-sexism education, and community organizing.

 

Mark Wasserman is the founder and Marketing Coordinator of Houses for Change™, a national campaign to raise awareness of homelessness and raise funds to help homeless families.  This innovative arts and crafts tzedakah box project engages families with homes to help families without.  Mark is also the Coordinator of the Family Promise program at B’nai Torah Congregation in Boca Raton, Florida, an interfaith project to help homeless families regain independence.

 

Jon Wolf is Director of the Institute for Jewish Activism, creator of BlueJew.com, 2008 co-chair of Orthodox Jews for Obama, organizer of Final Day of CAJE XI devoted to Pluralism, author of the Social Action section of The Jewish Catalog, founding president of Jewish Vegetarians, and he established & directed Community Action Dept. at Lincoln Square Synagogue, as well as being the former Social Policy Director of Synagogue Council of America.

 

Amanda Wood has been sharing the joys of Yiddish with her bobe since birth. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland and her master’s degree in School Psychology from Millersville University of Pennsylvania. Since 2007, Amanda has been working as a school psychologist in Baltimore City Public Schools. In this capacity, she works very closely collaborating with and training other educators to meet the needs of diverse learners.

 

Diana Yacobi, M.A.J.Ed. has been the Educational Director of Conservative synagogue schools. She created Sarah and David Interactive together with Lily Yacobi, to offer teachers and students a systematic approach to Hebrew reading. She continues to develop materials and offers training and workshops for the Sarah and David Interactive Program.

 

Diane Zimmerman, Associate Director of Religious Education, Temple Sinai, Washington DC, is primarily responsible for teacher training and professional development. She has been an educational leader for over 20 years as director of supplementary schools, chairperson of the Education Directors Council in DC, and as a workshop presenter. Diane researched vocational teachers in a study published in Jewish Education News. She learned a great deal about the teachers who work in Jewish education and this research informs her work and her teaching. She specializes in leading interactive, practical, on-target workshops for teachers and principals.

 

Sarah Zollman began teaching high school students, but has since found her calling with middle schoolers. She currently teaches 5th and 6th grade Judaics at Carmel Academy, a pluralistic day school in Greenwich, CT. She lives in New York City, and yes, the commute is worth it.

 

Sheva Zucker is the author of the textbooks Yiddish: An Introduction to the Language, Literature & Culture, 2 Vols. She teaches in the Uriel Weinreich Program in Yiddish Language, Literature and Culture at Bard College and YIVO Institute, NYC, and taught many years at Duke. She is currently director of the League for Yiddish and editor of its magazine Afn Shvel.

 

Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff, a Jewish educator, storyteller, and coach, trains teachers in storytelling. She co-teaches the “Oral History of the Holocaust” course at Goucher College in Maryland. Jennifer teaches storytelling to religious school students and to immigrant teens in Baltimore through a program sponsored by the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Jennifer performs Jewish historical and contemporary tales.

EXPO

EXPO HOURS AND INFO

 

EXPO HOURS:

 

The EXPO, located in the Science Building, will be open at the following times:

 

Sunday: 12 PM-5:15 PM

Monday: 10 AM-5:30 PM

Tuesday: 10 AM-5:45 PM

Wednesday: 9 AM-1:30 PM

 
 

Exhibitors List:

American Hebrew Academy

America's Only Jewish Pluralistic College Prep Boarding School.

Address: 4334 Hobbs Road Greensboro, NC 27410

Phone: 336-217-7100

E-mail: info@americanhebrewacademy.org

Website: http://www.americanhebrewacademy.org

And Thou Shalt Read

Choosy Books for Chosen People

Address: 4624 Smoke Rise Lane Marietta, GA 30062 USA

Phone: 770-650-1106

E-mail: sales@AndThouShaltRead.com

Website: http://www.andthoushaltread.com

Destiny Foundation

An Educational Media Foundation dedicated to bringing Jewish history to life in an exciting and interactive way.

Address: 386 Route 59 Monsey, NY 10952

Phone: 1-800-499-9346

Email: info@jewishdestiny.com

Website: http://www.jewishdestiny.com

Enjoy-A-Book Club

Providing a full line of Jewish books and outstanding traveling book fairs since 1980.

Address: 600 Broadway, Lynbrook, NY 11563

Phone: 516-569-0324

Email: enjoybook@aol.com

Website: http://enjoyabookclub.com

 

Family Promise

An Arts and Crafts Project to Help Homeless Families

Address: 71 Summit Avenue Summit, NJ 07901 
Phone: 908-273-1100 
Website:
www.familypromise.org/housesforchange

Interactive Posters

Educational tools to make your classroom come alive!

Address: 290 West End Avenue New York, NY 10023

Phone: 212-580-5016

Jackie Olenick Judaic Illuminations

Spectacular artwork based in Jewish text. A wide range of items includes watercolor and torn paper multi-media collages, Ketubot, and Jewelry.

Address: 21895 Palm Grass Drive Boca Raton, FL 33428

Phone: 305-490-7003 
E-mail: 
jackieolenick@gmail.com

Website: http://www.jackieolenickart.com

 

The Jewish Institute for Youth and Family, Inc.

A non-profit organization whose mission is to develop programs and materials teaching Jewish values to youth and families.

Address: 1618 Waters Edge Lane Reston, VA, 20190 

Phone: 703-471-5344 

Email: Berkson@mentsh.com

Website: www.mentsh.com

Jewish Party Supplies, LLC

You dream it, we print it! Personalized party supplies for any event or occasion.

Address: 1709 Clarendon Drive Greensboro, NC 27410
Phone: 866-494-2458
Email: info@jewishpartysupplies.com

Website: www.jewishpartysupplies.com

Jewish Women’s Archive

An organization committed to uncover, chronicle, and transmit to a broad public the rich history of American Jewish women.

Address: 138 Harvard Street Brookline, MA 02446

Phone: 617-232-2258

Website: http://jwa.org

Kar-Ben Publishing

A Growing Jewish Library for Children.

Address: 1251 Washington Ave N Minneapolis, MN 55401-1036

Phone: 1-800-4KARBEN (1-800-452-7236)

Website: www.karben.com

Kehot Publication Society

Educational books and materials for a wide range of learners.

Address: 770 Eastern Parkway Brooklyn, NY 11213

Phone: 877-4Merkos or 718-778-0226

Email: orders@Kehotonline.com

Website: www.kehot.com

Kinnor Software

Software tools to help you learn to chant Torah, Haftarah, Megillah, and Hebrew prayers.

Address: 3655 Seaside Dr. Suite 220 Key West, FL 33040

Phone: 305-293-8801

Email: info@kinnor.com

Website: http://kinnor.com

The Magnet Mogul

Quality Jewish educational Holiday Magnets and Frames for the home and classroom.

Address: 16030 Ventura Blvd., Suite 490 Encino, CA 91436

Phone and Fax: 818-990-5898 (10:00am - 4:00pm PST)

Email: info@themagnetmogul.com

Website: www.themagnetmogul.com

Mah Basak

Avideo series designed to engage kids and adults with Jewish values through puppets and music.

Phone: 734-657-7786

Email: mahbasak@gmail.com

Website: mahbasak.com

Mikva Tikva

Global Mikva Outreach

Address: 1360 44 Street Brooklyn, NY 11219 USA

Or in Israel: Post Office Box 4, Petach-Mikva=Tikva 49100

Email: ravad@mikvatikva.org

Website: http://www.mikvatikva.org

Nancy Katz and Wilmark Studios

Creating uniquely stunning Jewish artwork in a variety of mediums, specializing in silk painting and stained glass.

Address: 7 Williams Street P.O. Box 233 Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts 01370

    Nancy Katz:      Willmark:

    Phone: 413-625-6582     Phone: 413-386-7107

 

Neshama Soulworks Studio

Transforming life with art and soul.

Address: P.O. Box 2716 Merrifield, VA 22116-2716

Phone: 703-273-0485

Email: jennifer@soulworksstudio.com

Website: www.soulworksstudio.com

Sarah and David Interactive

A Method of teaching Hebrew makes it ultra-accessible to everyone and truly appealing.

Address: PO Box 5894 Englewood, NJ 07631

Phone: 201-227-6161

Email: info@sarahdavid.com

Website: http://www.sarahdavid.com

The William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education

America's largest pluralistic school offering advanced degrees in Jewish Education.

Address: 3080 Broadway New York, NY 10027

Phone: 212-678-8000

Website: www.jtsa.edu/davidson
Zerach.com

Creative and colorful education materials to enhance your students’ learning.

Address: 129-20A 18th Ave., College Point, NY 11356

Phone: 718-888-8740

Email: zerach@zerach.com

Website: http://www.zerach.com

 

Cross-References of Sessions By Subject

CROSS-REFERENCE OF SESSIONS BY SUBJECT  

Administration

S 3:45-5:15 PM   Creating Benefits For Yourself And Your Staff Ahouva Steinhaus

M 8:45-10:15 AM When The Traditional Religious School Setting No Longer Works: Come Learn

      How To Better Serve Families And Still Offer A Quality Jewish Education Jill D. Eisen and Dr. Eyal Bor

      M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Using Appreciative Inquiry To Drive Powerful, Positive Change Deborah Grayson Reigel

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Turn The Danger Down: Make Diversity Work For You Dr. Hana Bor

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Conversation Café: On Educational Leadership And Obstacles To Success Self

           Moderated

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Oh (Bleep!) Another Meeting? Deborah Grayson Riegel

      M 3:15-4:45 PM The Art Of Contract Negotiation: Know What You Are Worth, And Get What You Deserve Eitan Gutin

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Navigating The Politics Elizabeth Singer

M 8:45-10:15 AM How To Write And Use A Budget Ahouva Steinhaus

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Rules And Regs:  Oh My!  Creating Engaging And Fun Staff Orientations Diane

           Zimmerman

T 8:45-10:15 AM Director Survival Workshop Amy Ripps and Robin Eisenberg

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Hi, Mom! Hi, Dad! Anna Salomon

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Conversation Café: On Collaboration Between Day And Supplementary Schools     

      Self Moderated

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Standing On One Foot: The Mini-Mba For Busy Jewish Educators Deborah

           Grayson Riegel

    W 8:30-10:00 AM Grantwriting: Learn How To Write An Effective Proposal Ahouva Steinhaus

W 8:30-10:00 AM A Call To Leadership - Jewish Educator As Jewish Leader Gavin Hirsch

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Congregational Schools In Transition:  Challenge And Opportunity Josh Bender

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Hebrew Students Levels Of Performance- How To Assess Progress Liat Kadosh

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Engaging Parents In Their Child's Jewish Education Lori Riegel

M 8:45-10:15 AM Determining Which Students Need Accommodations To Learn Dr. Sandy Miller-

           Jacobs

Creative And Cultural Arts

W 10:15-11:45 AM Boker Tov, Boker Or: Songs & Chants & So Much More!!! Ellen Allard

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Incorporating Jewish Music Into The Jewish Ece Classroom (Even If You Are A

           Teacher Who "Can't Sing" Emily Aronoff

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Israeli Folk Dancing For Preschool Children  Donna Hendel

T 2:30-4:00 PM  You're Never Too Young To Sing From Your Heart  Susan Shane-Linder

T 8:45-10:15 AM Storytelling And Drama Games For The Jewish Classroom Jordan Hill

W 8:30-10:00 AM So You Told The Story – What Next? Richard Fagan

S 2:00-5:00 PM  Midrashic Art Karen Dresser

M 3:15-4:45 PM  An Improvisational/Participatory “Out-There!” Approach To Engaging Teens With

           Jewish Music And Concepts Jordan Hill

 

    M 8:45-10:15 AM Healing Scarves: Building A Caring Newcaje Community: What Will It Look

       Like? Nancy Katz

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Avadim Hayinu: Dance Your Way To Freedom Through The Holidays Aliya

           Cheskis-Cotel

M 1:30-4:30 PM  Ten Art Activities For The Cycle Of The Year Karen Dresser

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Musical Connections Among Jews, Muslims And Hindus Neil Schwartz

T 8:45-10:15 AM Bringing The Scribal Arts To Life Zerach Greenfield

M 3:15-4:45 PM  NewCAJE Chorale Linda Hirschhorn

M 8:45-10:15 AM Guitar Master Class Rabbi Larry Milder

M 8:45-11:45 AM Listen To Our Mentors: Young Adults Tell The Stories Of Experienced Jewish

           Educators Jennifer Rudick Zunikoff

S 3:45-5:15 PM  NewCAJE Chorale Linda Hirschhorn

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Story Spirit: Sharpening Your Storytelling Art Cherie Karo Schwartz

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Write On! Creative Writing For The Experiential Classroom Aliya Cheskis-Cotel

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Yes You Can!: Integrating The Arts Into Practically Any Lesson Plan Jennifer

           Judelsohn

T 4:15-5:45 PM  NewCAJE Chorale Linda Hirschhorn

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Live Storytelling Experience: Joining In! Peninnah Schram and Cherie Karo

           Schwartz

W 10:15-11:45 AM The Nashville Number System For Songleaders Michael Kates

W 8:30-10:00 AM Becoming A Jewish Storyteller Peninnah Schram

W 8:30-11:30 AM Holocaust Imagery: Engaging The Shoah Through Art Karen Dresser

W 8:30-10:00 AM Bringing The Arts Into Your Pesach Seder Lorraine Posner Arcus

M 10:30AM-12:00 PM Healing Scarves: Building A Caring Newcaje Community Nancy Katz

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM All Together Now: Using Art To Build Community Nancy Katz

T 8:45-10:15 AM Am I Awake?: A Workshop In Finding And Teaching Personal Connection In

           Contemporary Jewish Prayer Noah Aronson

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Prayer Beyond Words (The Nigun) Helene Kates

M 1:30-4:30 PM  Jewish Spiritual Direction For Teachers: A Step On Your Journey Marge Eiseman

           and Jennifer Judelsohn

T 8:45-10:15 AM Praying With Our Feet: Walking The Walk And Talking The Talk Janie Grackin,

           Helene Kates And Ellen Allard

Early Childhood

W 8:30-10:00 AM Bringing The Arts Into Your Pesach Seder Lorraine Posner Arcus

T 2:30-4:00 PM  You're Never Too Young To Sing From Your Heart Susan Shane-Linder

W 10:15-11:45 AM Spiritual And Engaging Children’s High Holiday Services: A Roadmap Jaime

           Lewis

W 10:15-11:45 AM Boker Tov, Boker Or: Songs & Chants & So Much More!!! Ellen Allard

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Incorporating Jewish Music Into The Jewish Ece Classroom (Even If You Are A

           Teacher Who "Can't Sing" Emily Aronoff

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Israeli Folk Dancing For Preschool Children Donna Hendel

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Totally Tot Shabbat With Ellen Allard Ellen Allard

M 8:45-10:15 AM A Giant Child-Created Siddur For Your Class Lorraine Posner Arcus

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Rosenfeld Legacy Project: Connecting Children's Literature With Judaic

           Heritage Emily Aronoff

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Infuse Your Preschool Day The Jewish Way! Lisa Lasovsky

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Successful Circle Time Activities, Games, Stories, Songs And Techniques (And

           Secret Weapons) For Early Ed Teachers Lauren Jane Dragutsky

T 8:45-10:15 AM Torah Alive! An Experiential Approach To Teaching Torah To Young Children

           Lorraine Posner Arcus

Ecology

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Traditional Jewish View Of Ecology And The Environment Nachum Amsel

S 2:00-3:30 PM  The Torah Of Food Philip Cohen

S 3:45-5:15 PM  Bal Tashchit: Every Day Is Earth Day Jill D. Eisen

M 1:30-3:00 PM  21st Century Education For 21st Century Students Jonathon Feinberg

Elementary School

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Shabbat Alive! A New Approach To Junior Congregation Lisa Aamodt

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Engaging Parents In Their Child's Jewish Education Lori Riegel

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Prayerbook Hebrew Can Be Fun For Grades 4-6 Eric Komar

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Differentiating Instruction Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

T 8:45-10:15 AM Storytelling And Drama Games For The Jewish Classroom Jordan Hill

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Chai Curriculum: Instruction Can Get Better And Better Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

W 8:30-10:00 AM So You Told The Story – What Next? Richard Fagan

M 1:30-3:00 PM  iProjects: A 21st Century Approach To Individualized Learning In Grades 4-8

           Cherie Koller-Fox

T 2:30-4:00 PM  At The Beginning…Teaching Genesis  Deborah Goldstein, Cherie Koller-Fox and

           Cathy Kaplan

      W 8:30-10:00 AM Conversation Café: On The Future Of Supplementary School Education Self Moderated

      M 1:30-3:00 PM How To Start Teaching Hebrew From Alef And To Choose The Right Topics To Teach Liat Kadosh

Family Education

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Creating Am Ehad Janie Grackin

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Making Sure V'shinantam Happens: The Benefits Of Family Education Miles L.

           Roger

Hebrew

M 1:30-3:00 PM  How To Start Teaching Hebrew From Alef And To Choose The Right Topics To

           Teach Liat Kadosh

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Hebrew Students Levels Of Performance- How To Assess Progress Liat Kadosh

M 8:45-10:15 AM Placing Objectives For Hebrew Language Teaching And How To Plan A Lesson

           Liat Kadosh

T 8:45-10:15   AMA School-Wide Program For Teaching Hebrew Reading Diana Yacobi

W 8:30-10:00 AM Jump Math Works. How Can We Do Jump Hebrew? Paul Solyn

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Prayerbook Hebrew Can Be Fun For Grades 4-6 Eric Komar

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Challenging Students - Creative Ways To Teach The Hebrew Language Liat

           Kadosh

History And/Or Israel

W 8:30-10:00 AM Teaching Anti-Semitism And The Holocaust To Teenagers Gerry Hecht

W 8:30-11:30 AM Holocaust Imagery: Engaging The Shoah Through Art Karen Dresser

S 3:45-5:15 PM  A Framework And Methodolgy For Teaching Holocaust Resistance Fred Guttman

W 8:30-10:00 AM Living The Legacy: Teaching Social Justice In Historical Context Etta King

T 2:30-4:00 PM   The Captives Return: Descendants Of Forced Iberian Converts Find Their Way

           Back To Judaism Jonina Duker

M 3:15-4:45 PM  How To Teach Israel Effectively And Convincingly In The Digital Age Nachum

           Amsel

M 3:15-4:45 PM  When History Has A Name, A Face And A Story:Using New Technologies To

           Connect Students To 20th C Jewish History Lauren B. Granite, Ph.D.

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Creating Am Ehad Janie Grackin

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Move Beyond Coping: Methods For Teaching The Holocaust Dr. Hana Bor

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Future Of History: Online Resources To Re-Live The Modern Jewish

           Experience Adam Soclof

M 8:45-10:15 AM Conversation Café:  On The Effect Of The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Self

           Moderated

T 8:45-10:15 AM Teaching The Holocaust Through The Language Of Today: The Coming Of Age In

           The Holocaust Website And Curriculum Dr. Paul Radensky

Holidays

W 8:30-10:00 AM Bringing The Arts Into Your Pesach Seder Lorraine Posner Arcus

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Totally Tot Shabbat With Ellen Allard Ellen Allard

T 2:30-5:30 PM  Comfort Shawls: Embracing The Cycle Of Love And Loss Marge Eiseman

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Restoring The "Rich" In Jewish Ritual Sam Glaser

T 8:45-10:15 AM The Jewish Calendar Yosef Leibowitz

T 2:30-4:00 PM  You're Never Too Young To Sing From Your Heart Susan Shane-Linder

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Avadim Hayinu: Dance Your Way To Freedom Through The Holidays Aliya

           Cheskis-Cotel

M 1:30-4:30 PM  Ten Art Activities For The Cycle Of The Year Karen Dresser

W 10:15-11:45 AM Spiritual And Engaging Children’s High Holiday Services: A Roadmap Jaime

           Lewis

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM My Father Was A Wandering What? Everett Fox

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Shabbat Alive! A New Approach To Junior Congregation Lisa Aamodt

Klal Yisrael – Community Building

M 10:30AM-12:00PM Healing Scarves: Building A Caring NewCAJE Community Nancy Katz

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM All Together Now: Using Art To Build Community Nancy Katz

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Oy Vey They're Gay: Celebrating Diveristy And Transforming Jewish Educational

           Settings Joanna Ware

S 3:45-5:15 PM  Conversation Café: On Intermarriage  Self Moderated

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Building Community In The Classroom Robin Eisenberg

W 10:15-11:45 AM Harnessing Community To Create Change Joanna Ware

W 8:30-10:00 AM Conversation Café: On Pluralism Self Moderated

M 8:45-10:15 AM Healing Scarves: Building A Caring NewCAJE Community: What Will It Look

           Like? Nancy Katz

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Turn The Danger Down: Make Diversity Work For You Dr. Hana Bor

Moral DeveloPMent And Ethics

M 8:45-10:15 AM Shalom Bayit For Teens: Parent-Teen Relations William Berkson

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Movies And Morals Nachum Amsel

T 8:45-10:15 AM Words That Harm, Words That Help—Teaching About Lashon Hara William

           Berkson

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Teaching Jewish Values Through Song Eric Komar

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Oy Vey They're Gay: Celebrating Diveristy And Transforming Jewish Educational

           Settings Joanna Ware

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Pirke Avot: Applying Ancient Wisdom Today William Berkson

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Is Lying Ever Permitted In Judaism Nachum Amsel

Prayer

M 8:45-10:15 AM A Giant Child-Created Siddur For Your Class Lorraine Posner Arcus

W 10:15-11:45 AM Spiritual And Engaging Children’s High Holiday Services: A Roadmap Jaime

       Lewis

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Prayerbook Hebrew Can Be Fun For Grades 4-6 Eric Komar

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Shabbat Alive! A New Approach To Junior Congregation Lisa Aamodt

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM  A Hat Full Of Prayers: Make Any Prayer Engaging For Your Teens Eitan Gutin

T 4:15-5:45 PM  But I Don't Wanna Pray Today! Tefillah For The Tween Sarah Zollman

T 8:45-11:45 AM Old Wine In New Bottles - Trope And Nusach Neil Schwartz

T 8:45-10:15 AM Am I Awake?: A Workshop In Finding And Teaching Personal Connection In

           Contemporary Jewish Prayer Noah Aronson

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Whispers Of Shema  Helene Kates

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Much More Than “Thanks For The Grub”–A Look At Birkat Hamazon Richard

           Fagan

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Stories We Pray Joel Lurie Grishaver

Schooling

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Engaging Parents In Their Child's Jewish Education Lori Riegel

M 8:45-10:15 AM Making Things Stick Part I: Cooperative Learning Diane Zimmerman

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Making Things Stick Part 2: Active Learning Diane Zimmerman

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Roadmap For Hebrew School Success-- Teaching For Enduring Understanding

           Marcy Berger

M 8:45-10:15 AM When The Traditional Religious School Setting No Longer Works: Come Learn

      How To Better Serve Families And Still Offer A Quality Jewish Education Jill D. Eisen and Dr. Eyal Bor

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Differentiating Instruction Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

Special Needs

M 8:45-10:15 AM Determining Which Students Need Accommodations To Learn Dr. Sandy Miller-

           Jacobs

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Making Accommodations For Students With Special Learning Needs Dr. Sandy

           Miller-Jacobs

 

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Instructional Strategies That Foster Creative And Engaging Inclusive Classrooms

           Dr. Sandy Miller-Jacobs

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Whispers Of Shema Helene Kates

Spirituality

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM But I Can't See My Soul! How To Teach The World Of The Spirit To Our Youth  

           Sam Glaser

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Prayer Beyond Words (The Nigun) Helene Kates

W 10:15-11:45 AM Aseret Hadibrot As A System For Spiritual Living Rabbi Tracee Rosen

M 1:30-4:30 PM  Jewish Spiritual Direction For Teachers: A Step On Your Journey Marge Eiseman

           and Jennifer Judelsohn

T 8:45-10:15 AM Conversation Café:  On Faith Self Moderated

T 8:45-10:15 AM  Praying With Our Feet: Walking The Walk And Talking The Talk Janie Grackin,

           Helene Kates and Ellen Allard

Teaching Techniques

M 1:30-3:00 PM  iProjects: A 21st Century Approach To Individualized Learning In Grades 4-8

           Cherie Koller-Fox

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Rosenfeld Legacy Project: Connecting Children's Literature With Judaic

           Heritage Emily Aronoff

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Chai Curriculum: Instruction Can Get Better And Better Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Challenging Students - Creative Ways To Teach The Hebrew Language Liat

           Kadosh

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Differentiating Instruction Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Experiencing Torah Joel Lurie Grishaver

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Teaching Jewishly Joel Lurie Grishaver

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Conversation Café: On The Role Of “Fun” In Jewish Education Self Moderated

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM I Wanna Be A Wizard! Hebrew School Goes Camp Deborah Salomon

T 8:45-10:15 AM 13 Principles Of Teaching Anna Salomon

T 8:45-11:45 AM  Teaching As A Learning Coach: Creating An Active Classroom Adam Tilove

W 10:15-11:45 AM Pop Culture Isn't Scary: Meeting Students Where They Are, And Making It Jewish

           Emilia Diamant

W 8:30-10:00 AM Teacher Survival Kit Amy Ripps and Robin Eisenberg

T 2:30-5:30 PM  Comfort Shawls: Embracing The Cycle Of Love And Loss Marge Eiseman

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Making Things Stick Part 2:  Active Learning Diane Zimmerman

T 8:45-10:15 AM Storytelling And Drama Games For The Jewish Classroom Jordan Hill

S 3:45-5:15 PM  A Framework And Methodolgy For Teaching Holocaust Resistance Fred Guttman

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Move Beyond Coping: Methods For Teaching The Holocaust Dr. Hana Bor

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Shabbat Alive! A New Approach To Junior Congregation Lisa Aamodt

M 8:45-10:15 AM Making Things Stick Part I:  Cooperative Learning Diane Zimmerman

M 1:30-3:00 PM  21st Century Education For 21st Century Students Jonathon Feinberg

M 8:45-10:15 AM Empowering Your Students To Generate Midrashim Hal Miller-Jacobs

Technology

M 1:30-3:00 PM  21st Century Education For 21st Century Students Jonathon Feinberg

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Technology In Education 201 Efraim Feinstein

M 8:45-10:15 AM Technology In Education 101 Efraim Feinstein

M 3:15-4:45 PM  How To Teach Israel Effectively And Convincingly In The Digital Age Nachum

           Amsel

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Future Of History: Online Resources To Re-Live The Modern Jewish

           Experience Adam Soclof

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Movies And Morals Nachum Amsel

Teens

S 3:45-5:15 PM  The Importance Of Hebrew Names: Setting An Example For Our Students

           Immanuel Ravad

S 3:45-5:15 PM  Madrikhim And Mentors: Teens Taking On Leadership Roles In School Lee

           Brice

W 10:15-11:45 AM Managing, Mentoring & Meaning: Making Your Madrichim Program Work For

           You (& Your Teens)! Rachel Kasten

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Movies And Morals Nachum Amsel

S 2:00-5:00 PM  Midrashic Art Karen Dresser

M 3:15-4:45 PM  An Improvisational/Participatory “Out-There!” Approach To Engaging Teens With

           Jewish Music And Concepts Jordan Hill

W 8:30-10:00 AM Teaching Anti-Semitism And The Holocaust To Teenagers Gerry Hecht

M 8:45-10:15 AM Shalom Bayit For Teens: Parent-Teen Relations William Berkson

T 8:45-10:15 AM Words That Harm, Words That Help—Teaching About Lashon Hara William

           Berkson

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM A Hat Full Of Prayers: Make Any Prayer Engaging For Your Teens Eitan Gutin

T 4:15-5:45 PM  But I Don't Wanna Pray Today! Tefillah For The Tween Sarah Zollman

T 8:45-11:45 AM Old Wine In New Bottles - Trope And Nusach Neil Schwartz

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM But I Can't See My Soul! How To Teach The World Of The Spirit To Our Youth

           Sam Glaser

M 8:45-10:15 AM Unpacking Difficult Texts Tamara Beliak

T 2:30-4:00 PM  What’s My Story?: Expanding The Bat/Bar Mitzvah Experience Etta King

      M 1:30-3:00 PM They Come For Their Friends… Creating A High School Midrasha Where Teens Want To Come Lee Brice

Tikkun Ha’olam

T 8:45-10:15 AM Praying With Our Feet: Walking The Walk And Talking The Talk Janie Grackin,

           Helene Kates and Ellen Allard

M 8:45-10:15 AM Engaging Families In Homelessness Social Action Mark Wasserman and Robin

           Eisenberg

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Service-Learning In Jewish Education And Jewish Ways Of Knowing Gail Bretan

W 8:30-10:00 AM Living The Legacy: Teaching Social Justice In Historical Context Etta King

Torah L’shma

S 2:00-3:30 PM  Is Lying Ever Permitted In Judaism Nachum Amsel

M 1:30-3:00 PM  The Book Of Psalms Yosef Leibowitz

M 1:30-3:00 PM  The Historical Integrity Of Our Communal Narrative Jonina Duker

M 1:30-3:00 PM  Jewish Humor Leo Michel Abrami

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Split: The Difference-- Jewish Unity And Compromise Jon Wolf

T 2:30-4:00 PM  Introduction To Talmud Yosef Leibowitz

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Samson Cycle Everett Fox

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Concept Of A Personal Calling In Hassidism And Psychology Leo Michel

           Abrami

W 10:15-11:45 AM Last Hope For Audacity? Jews & Politics Today Jon Wolf

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Musical Connections Among Jews, Muslims And Hindus Neil Schwartz

W 10:15-11:45 AM Aseret Hadibrot As A System For Spiritual Living Rabbi Tracee Rosen

Torah, Text And Tradition

T 8:45-10:15 AM Torah Alive! An Experiential Approach To Teaching Torah To Young Children

           Lorraine Posner Arcus

T 2:30-4:00 PM  At The Beginning…Teaching Genesis  Deborah Goldstein, Cherie Koller-Fox and

           Cathy Kaplan

S 3:45-5:15 PM  The Importance Of Hebrew Names: Setting An Example For Our Students

           Immanuel Ravad

M 8:45-10:15 AM Unpacking Difficult Texts Tamara Beliak

T 2:30-4:00 PM  What’s My Story?: Expanding The Bat/Bar Mitzvah Experience Etta King

M 10:30 AM-12:00 PM My Father Was A Wandering What? Everett Fox

M 3:15-4:45 PM  Pirke Avot: Applying Ancient Wisdom Today William Berkson

M 8:45-10:15 AM Empowering Your Students To Generate Midrashim Hal Miller-Jacobs

M 8:45-11:45 AM Surviving The Wilderness - Torah For Baby Boomers Fred Guttman and Nancy

           Guttman

S 3:45-5:15 PM  Monsters Of The Midrash David Feder

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Jacob And Israel: Wrestling With God Everett Fox

T 8:45-10:15 AM Torah And Science: The Questions Students Ask, And Some Answers Paul Solyn

W 10:15-11:45 AM Imperfectly Perfect: Confronting The Legacy Of Imperfection In Our Biblical

           Heroes Sam Glaser

W 10:15-11:45 AM How To Teach Bible To Adults Yudit Natkin

T 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Music And Leadership. A Kabbalistic Fugue Joel Lurie Grishaver

S 2:00-5:00 PM  Midrashic Art Karen Dresser

T 8:45-10:15 AM Bringing The Scribal Arts To Life Zerach Greenfield

M 1:30-3:00 PM  The Book Of Psalms Yosef Leibowitz

T 4:15-5:45 PM  The Chai Curriculum: Instruction Can Get Better And Better Alan J. Levin Ph.D.

T 4:15-5:45 PM  Experiencing Torah Joel Lurie Grishaver